Monday 11 December 2017

Yoko Ono tells of wartime hunger

Yoko Ono has told of her wartime hardship during a campaign to fight childhood hunger around the world. (AP/Koji Sasahara)
Yoko Ono has told of her wartime hardship during a campaign to fight childhood hunger around the world. (AP/Koji Sasahara)

Yoko Ono has said her own bitter experience in Japan during the Second World War inspired her to support a campaign to fight childhood hunger around the world.

The 80-year-old widow of ex-Beatle John Lennon said that she believes he would be happy to see his song Imagine used by WhyHunger and Hard Rock to raise support for their child nutrition and sustainable farming efforts in 22 countries.

Like Ono, many Japanese fled Tokyo during wartime bombing raids. Ono said some she knew starved to death and she sometimes went to school without lunch and just told classmates she was not hungry.

AP

"My husband and I really wanted to do something for the world, especially for the children," Ono said at the Hard Rock Cafe in Tokyo's glitzy Roppongi district. "Children have pride, too, so they don't beg you, but they are in pain and they are starving."

Popular Taiwanese rock band MayDay turned out to support the project, playing their own rendition of Imagine.

Ono, who was born into a wealthy family, experienced hunger like many other Japanese who fled Tokyo during wartime bombing raids. Some she knew starved to death or died from eating poisonous mushrooms they collected in the hills.

"I remember being hungry and I know it's so difficult to just be hungry," she said. "One day I didn't bring a lunchbox. The other kids asked, 'Don't you want to eat?'. I just said, 'No, I'm not hungry'."

Ono said she was grateful for what she has learned through her involvement in the Imagine There's No Hunger programme, which works with community groups to help grow food to alleviate hunger and promote self-sufficiency.

"I'm going to be 81 in three months," she said. " I love learning because it gives me power and wisdom."

AP

Press Association

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