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SpaceX: Elon Musk's spacecraft launches today but here's how it could land closer to Kerry than outer space

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The SpaceX Falcon 9, with the Crew Dragon spacecraft on top of the rocket, is raised onto Launch Pad 39-A, Tuesday, May 26, 2020, at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Two astronauts will fly on the SpaceX Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station scheduled for launch on May 27. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

The SpaceX Falcon 9, with the Crew Dragon spacecraft on top of the rocket, is raised onto Launch Pad 39-A, Tuesday, May 26, 2020, at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Two astronauts will fly on the SpaceX Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station scheduled for launch on May 27. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

The SpaceX Falcon 9, with the Crew Dragon spacecraft on top of the rocket, is raised onto Launch Pad 39-A, Tuesday, May 26, 2020, at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Two astronauts will fly on the SpaceX Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station scheduled for launch on May 27. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

A spacecraft that is expected to launch from American soil tonight could end up landing closer to Co Kerry than in outer space.

NASA is preparing to send astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to orbit outer space in a spacecraft built by SpaceX, a company founded by Elon Musk.

It's the first time SpaceX will launch people into space.

However, space commentator, Leo Enright, said that the two men could find themselves closer to Skellig Micheal, Co Kerry, than to space if the mission fails.

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Crews work on the SpaceX Crew Dragon, attached to a Falcon 9 booster rocket, as it sits horizontal on Pad39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S. May 26, 2020.  REUTERS/Steve Nesius

Crews work on the SpaceX Crew Dragon, attached to a Falcon 9 booster rocket, as it sits horizontal on Pad39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S. May 26, 2020. REUTERS/Steve Nesius

Crews work on the SpaceX Crew Dragon, attached to a Falcon 9 booster rocket, as it sits horizontal on Pad39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S. May 26, 2020. REUTERS/Steve Nesius

"We're not expecting this to happen, But the blunt reality is that spaceflight is a dangerous business," he told RTÉ's Morning Ireland.

"These men will liftoff from Cape Canaveral, they will blast their way up to the east coast of the United States. They will enter orbit, high above the Atlantic if everything goes well.

"But if anything goes wrong in the final seconds before they go into orbit, there is only one thing they can do, fire their booster rockets to aim themselves to splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean, just 40 kilometres from Skellig Michael, they will land in the Atlantic Ocean, just 40 kilometers off the coast of Ireland."

He said the trip is a "test of the launch system."

"They want to make sure that they can safely send two astronauts to link up with the space station, and then, potentially they could spend a number of weeks, living and working on the space station."

Mr Enright added that if the mission is successful, it could "open up the prospect that they start launching tourists who pay for their own ride, and it could become potentially a big big business. "

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Crews work on the SpaceX Crew Dragon, attached to a Falcon 9 booster rocket, as it sits horizontal on Pad39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S. May 26, 2020.  REUTERS/Steve Nesius

Crews work on the SpaceX Crew Dragon, attached to a Falcon 9 booster rocket, as it sits horizontal on Pad39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S. May 26, 2020. REUTERS/Steve Nesius

Crews work on the SpaceX Crew Dragon, attached to a Falcon 9 booster rocket, as it sits horizontal on Pad39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S. May 26, 2020. REUTERS/Steve Nesius

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The launch will take place at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 9:30 pm Irish time.

NASA will stream the launch from it's website, which can be found here.


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