Thursday 15 November 2018

Sensor replaced the day before Lion Air jet crashed into sea

Indonesian investigators are investigating the tragedy in which 189 people died.

A engine recovered from the crashed Lion Air jet (Achmad Ibrahim/AP)
A engine recovered from the crashed Lion Air jet (Achmad Ibrahim/AP)

By Niniek Karmini and Andi Jatmiko

A crucial sensor that is the subject of a Boeing safety bulletin was replaced on a Lion Air jet the day before it plunged into the Java Sea, Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee has said.

Boeing said its bulletin, sent to airlines on Tuesday, reiterates guidelines on how pilots should respond to erroneous data from an “angle of attack” sensor following the October 29 crash that killed 189 people.

The sensor keeps track of the angle of the aircraft nose relative to oncoming air to prevent the plane from stalling and diving.

ipanews_8497a7e1-560e-4d92-9cf4-37b58142972d_embedded239544325
Relatives sprinkle flowers for the victims (Tatan Syuflana/AP)

Soerjanto Tjahjono, chairman of the transport safety committee, said on Wednesday that airspeed indicator malfunctions on the jet’s last four flights, which were revealed by analysis of the flight data recorder, were intertwined with the sensor issue.

Lion Air’s first two attempts to address the airspeed indicator problem did not work and for the Boeing 737 MAX 8 plane’s second to last flight, the angle of attack sensors were replaced, he said.

On that flight, from Bali to Jakarta, the two sensors disagreed.

The plane went into a sudden dive minutes after take-off, which the pilots were able to recover from.

They decided to fly on to Jakarta at a lower than normal altitude.

On the basis of the October 28 flight, Indonesian investigators said they would provide recommendations to Boeing for distribution to airlines around the world about how to deal with a similar situation.

ipanews_8497a7e1-560e-4d92-9cf4-37b58142972d_embedded239464315
Port officials stand near debris from Lion Air Flight 610 (Binsar Bakkara/AP)

But Boeing said in its statement on Wednesday that it was directing airlines to “existing” flight crew procedures to address angle of attack sensor problems.

Boeing said it is continuing to work with the Indonesian investigation.

Indonesia’s search and rescue agency on Wednesday extended the search effort for a second time, saying it will continue until Sunday.

Body parts are still being recovered and searchers continue to hunt for the cockpit voice recorder.

Press Association

Today's news headlines, directly to your inbox every morning.

Editors Choice

Also in World News