| 11.2°C Dublin

Prosecutors investigate pair who admit chipping off pieces from Egyptian pyramid

Close

CAIRO, EGYPT - JANUARY 24:  Tourist visits the Giza Pyramids and Sphinx in Cairo on January 24, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt.  The country is struggling with falling tourism figures and rising unemployment following last year's revolution, which ousted President Hosni Mubarak. The Egyptian parliament, chaired by Mahmoud el-Saqqahm, met yesterday and elected leading Muslim Brotherhood member Saad al-Katatnias as speaker.  (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

CAIRO, EGYPT - JANUARY 24: Tourist visits the Giza Pyramids and Sphinx in Cairo on January 24, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. The country is struggling with falling tourism figures and rising unemployment following last year's revolution, which ousted President Hosni Mubarak. The Egyptian parliament, chaired by Mahmoud el-Saqqahm, met yesterday and elected leading Muslim Brotherhood member Saad al-Katatnias as speaker. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Jeff J Mitchell

CAIRO, EGYPT - JANUARY 24: Tourist visits the Giza Pyramids and Sphinx in Cairo on January 24, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. The country is struggling with falling tourism figures and rising unemployment following last year's revolution, which ousted President Hosni Mubarak. The Egyptian parliament, chaired by Mahmoud el-Saqqahm, met yesterday and elected leading Muslim Brotherhood member Saad al-Katatnias as speaker. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

German prosecutors say they're investigating two self-styled researchers who have admitted chipping off a piece from a pyramid's burial chamber in their attempt to prove a theory the structure was built by people pre-dating the ancient Egyptians.

Chemniz prosecutor Ingrid Burghart said that Dominique Goerlitz and Stefan Erdmann are under investigation on suspicion of theft.

Egyptian authorities said six Egyptians were already in custody on charges of being accessories to the German men on their expedition last April.

Egyptian prosecutor Hisham Barakat says the men entered the famed Giza pyramids with permits to visit but not excavate, and left with samples of stone from the ramparts of two tombs and the burial room of King Khufu.

The Germans apologised in December, saying their purpose was purely scientific.

Online Editors