Monday 20 November 2017

Trump dominates social media during Presidential debate

A journalist records a video from screen as Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A journalist records a video from screen as Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the first presidential debate with U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S., September 26, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Here is how the debate was discussed and researched online.

:: Donald Trump dominated conversation on Twitter, with 62% of related posts mentioning him.

:: On Google the top five fact check questions for Hillary Clinton in the US were, in descending order: Is stop and frisk unconstitutional? How many shootings in Chicago? What happened in Benghazi? What emails did Clinton delete? What did Clinton's dad do?

:: For Mr Trump they were: Did Trump support the Iraq war? Is stop and frisk unconstitutional? How many shootings in Chicago? How much money did Trump get from his dad? How many times has Trump filed bankruptcy?

:: One third of Twitter users talking about the debates used the hashtag #ImWithHer.

:: In a four-hour period 54% of candidate searches on Google were for Hillary Clinton, 41% for Donald Trump, 4% for the Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson and 1% for the Green candidate Jill Stein.

:: The top tweeted moments of the first presidential debate were Mr Trump's comments that he has a "good temperament", his comments on stop and frisk procedure and Mr Trump and Mrs Clinton's plans for defeating Islamic State.

:: The top five most-tweeted topics in descending order were: The economy, foreign affairs, energy and environment, terrorism and guns.

:: A tweet by Donald Trump in 2012 that "The concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive" was retweeted the most times during the debate. Since he made the comment it has been shared more than 80,000 times and liked more than 46,000 times.

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