| 17°C Dublin

Trump cheerleader under investigation for voter fraud in presidential election

Close

Donald and Melania Trump leave the White House for the last time before Joe Biden's inauguration. Photo: Reuters/Leah Millis

Donald and Melania Trump leave the White House for the last time before Joe Biden's inauguration. Photo: Reuters/Leah Millis

Donald and Melania Trump leave the White House for the last time before Joe Biden's inauguration. Photo: Reuters/Leah Millis

Georgia state officials have launched a voter fraud probe into lawyer L Lin Wood, one of the cheerleaders for Donald Trump’s false claims that widespread cheating decided the US presidential election.

Mr Wood spoke at rallies and filed unsuccessful lawsuits seeking to undo President Joe Biden’s victory in the state, which Mr Biden won by nearly 11,700 votes.

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger's office confirmed it is investigating whether Mr Wood was a legal resident when he cast his ballot in the November 3 election.

The inquiry was prompted by an email Mr Wood allegedly sent a television reporter stating he had been living in South Carolina for “several months” after buying a home there in April, officials said.

Mr Wood (68) denied he had moved out of the state before the election. It wasn’t until Monday this week, he said, when he filed paperwork to make the South Carolina property he bought in April 2020 his new official residence.

“I’ve always been a resident of the state of Georgia until I declared the change of residency to South Carolina,” he said. “I never considered myself domiciled in 2020 anywhere than Georgia.”

The probe is the latest Mr Wood faces for his role in spreading Mr Trump’s baseless claims, a stance that has also left him banned from Twitter, visited by the Secret Service and investigated by the state law association.

In December, he filed a federal lawsuit looking to overturn Georgia’s presidential election results by alleging the state’s voting procedures involving mail-in ballots and signature matching were unlawful. Earlier that month, an appeals court rejected a similar lawsuit filed by him contesting the election results. That same court also rejected another lawsuit that sought to examine voting machines.

One day after the Capitol riots last month, Twitter permanently suspended two of Mr Woods’s accounts and he took to Parler. One post appeared to threaten then vice president Mike Pence. It read: “Get the firing squads ready. Pence goes FIRST.” The site later removed the post.

The new inquiry into his voting status began with an email to a WSB-TV reporter that read: “I have been domiciled in South Carolina for several months after purchasing property in the state in April.”

Daily Digest Newsletter

Get ahead of the day with the morning headlines at 7.30am and Fionnán Sheahan's exclusive take on the day's news every afternoon, with our free daily newsletter.

This field is required

Georgia states a person can no longer be considered a resident if they move to “another state with the intention of making it such person’s residence”.

“I’m confident that I spent more time in Georgia than in South Carolina,” he said. “I always considered my residency to be in the state of Georgia.

“I didn’t change it until February 1.” (© Washington Post)

© Washington Post


Most Watched





Privacy