Saturday 24 February 2018

Trophy hunter who shot rare snow leopard prompts fury with photo

Hossein Golabchi smiles with the big cat draped over his shoulders, which appears to have been shot twice in its hind leg
Hossein Golabchi smiles with the big cat draped over his shoulders, which appears to have been shot twice in its hind leg

Samuel Osborne

A petition has been launched to bring a US trophy hunter to justice after he shot a rare snow leopard and was pictured grinning with the body.

The picture shows Hossein Golabchi, who is also known by his nickname "Soudy", smiling with the big cat draped over his shoulders.

The animal appears to have been shot at least twice in hind leg.

The American hunter, originally from Iran, is believed to have killed the animal in central Asia.

More than 100,000 people have signed a petition calling for Mr Golabchi to be brought to justice. It has a goal of 110,000 supporters.

The Care2 petition was launched by Amanda, from TERA International (Tiger Exotic Animal Ranger Awareness), on 23 October, International Snow Leopard Day.

"There's nowhere in the entire Western Hemisphere (and the rest of the world) that allows anyone to go into Central Asia to 'trophy hunt' a snow leopard," the petition reads.

"It is illegal to own their body parts or their beautiful fur and importing their remains into the United States is a federal offence.

"This long-time and prolific trophy hunter of rare cats must be made an example of or these magnificent cats will vanish forever."

“Snow leopards have never been numerous. The thought of a wealthy American specifically seeking one out to destroy its life is unfathomable. It also damages the communities around the snow leopard.

"He needs to be the example and needs to be in prison. Thank you, Amanda.”

There are thought to be between 3,500 and 7,000 snow leopards left in the wild, with 600 to 700 in zoos around the world, according to Defenders of Wildlife.

Exact numbers are hard to determine due to the leopard's shy nature, it also noted.

Mr Golabchi could not be contacted for comment.

Independent News Service

Promoted Links

Today's news headlines, directly to your inbox every morning.

Promoted Links

Editors Choice

Also in World News