News President Trump

Tuesday 22 January 2019

Vow on Trump: 'We are going to impeach the motherf****r'

New face: Democrat Rashida Tlaib, from Michigan, joins Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi for the swearing-in on Capitol Hill yesterday. Photo: Reuters
New face: Democrat Rashida Tlaib, from Michigan, joins Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi for the swearing-in on Capitol Hill yesterday. Photo: Reuters

Sarah Harvard

Democrat Brad Sherman will introduce articles of impeachment against US President Donald Trump on the first day of the 116th Congress.

They will allege Mr Trump obstructed justice in the firing of former FBI Director James Comey. Mr Comey was leading the federal investigation into Russian election meddling in the 2016 election and possible collusion with Trump campaign officials at the time, with it subsequently being taken over by special counsel Robert Mueller.

Fed head: Jerome Powell, US Federal Reserve chairman, will refuse to quit. Photo: Reuters
Fed head: Jerome Powell, US Federal Reserve chairman, will refuse to quit. Photo: Reuters

"There is no reason it shouldn't be before the Congress," California representative Mr Sherman told the 'Los Angeles Times'. "Every day, Donald Trump shows that leaving the White House would be good for our country."

Mr Sherman's decision to introduce the resolution in the new Congress, having also done so in the previous Republican-led session, sets him at odds with his party leadership's call to prioritise legislation and oversight of Mr Trump's government over impeachment.

However, Mr Sherman does not think his measure will hinder or cause any issues for his party colleagues.

"Every member of the House will have to address [the issue] whether there are formal articles of impeachment pending," he added.

Mr Sherman also filed articles of impeachment against the president in July 2017 and was among the 60 or so Democrats who voted in favour of it, prompting impeachment proceedings in December 2017. That measure, however, failed.

It comes as a US congresswoman vowed to remove Mr Trump from office, setting the stage for further political clashes between the president and resurgent Democrats.

"We're gonna go in there and we're going to impeach the mother****r," Rashida Tlaib was filmed telling ecstatic supporters, hours after she was sworn into Congress for the first time.

The politician, alongside Ilhan Omar, is one of the first two Muslim-American women to serve on Capitol Hill.

The Democrats hold a majority of seats in the House of Representatives following November 2018's midterm elections, a victory that threatens Mr Trump's grasp on power.

Politicians remain divided on how best to oppose the president. However, House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, who was appointed House Speaker, said she does not intend the party to seek grounds for impeachment unless there is clear evidence and a bipartisan agreement on the issue at hand.

Ms Pelosi promised to "restore integrity to government" and outlined an agenda "to lower health costs and prescription drug prices and protect people with pre-existing medical conditions; to increase pay cheques by rebuilding America with green and modern infrastructure from sea to shining sea".

Some Democrats have also suggested waiting for special counsel Robert Mueller to complete his investigation before going forward with impeachment proceedings.

Mr Trump has scoffed at these calls for impeachments and said in December he believes Americans "would revolt" if he were impeached.

Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell said yesterday he will not resign if asked to do so by Mr Trump, a message that heartened investors who had been concerned by the president's repeated attacks on his hand-picked choice to lead the nation's central bank.

Appearing on a panel with his two predecessors - Janet Yellen and Ben Bernanke - Mr Powell said the central bank intends to be flexible going forward in determining when to hike its key policy rate.

The US stock market has seen steep declines since October, a development Mr Trump blamed on the Fed's continued rate hikes, although the president's trade dispute with China as well as concerns about global economic growth also played a part in the market volatility.

Mr Trump's attacks had become so intense they had raised concerns that he might be considering firing Mr Powell, which could send the market into a further tailspin.

Asked if he would resign if Mr Trump asked him to, Mr Powell responded with a short "no".

The Dow Jones Industrial Average added about 200 points during Mr Powell's appearance and was up about 600 points. A strong US jobs report and hopes upcoming talks between the US and China could pave the way for an end to the trade dispute also buoyed investors.

Irish Independent

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