Saturday 15 December 2018

Trump responds to alleged Russian meddling saying 'campaign began long before I announced White House bid'

Donald Trump
Donald Trump

Warren Strobel

US President Donald Trump has said Russia started anti-US campaign "long before" he announced his intention to run for the White House.

In a tweet posted after a number of Russian individuals and entities were charged with alleged election meddling the president said: "Russia started their anti-US campaign in 2014, long before I announced that I would run for President. The results of the election were not impacted. The Trump campaign did nothing wrong - no collusion!"

Earlier on Friday the US Special Counsel said in an indictment that a Russian Internet agency and more than a dozen Russians interfered in the US election campaign from 2014 through 2016 in a multi-pronged effort with the aim of supporting then-businessman Donald Trump and disparaging his rival Hillary Clinton, the US Special Counsel said in an indictment on Friday.

The 37-page indictment filed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller described a conspiracy to disrupt the US election by people who adopted false online personas to push divisive messages; traveled to the United States to collect intelligence; and staged political rallies while posing as Americans.

Russia's Internet Research Agency "had a strategic goal to sow discord in the US political system, including the 2016 US presidential election," the indictment states.

"Defendants posted derogatory information about a number of candidates, and by early to mid-2016, Defendants' operations included supporting the presidential campaign of then-candidate Donald J. Trump ... and disparaging Hillary Clinton."

Robert Mueller
Robert Mueller

The indictment broadly echoes the conclusions of a January 2017 US intelligence community assessment, which found that Russia had meddled in the election, and that its goals eventually included aiding Trump.

Trump has never unequivocally accepted that report, and has denounced Mueller's probe into whether his campaign colluded with the Kremlin as a "witch hunt."

Facebook and Twitter both declined to comment on the indictment.

The court document appeared likely to provide ammunition to Democrats and others arguing for a continued aggressive probe of the matter.

The indictment names the Internet Research Agency, based in St. Petersburg, Russia; 13 Russian nationals; and two other companies.

The 2017 intelligence agency finding has spawned investigations into any ties between Republican Trump's campaign and Moscow. Russia denies interfering in the election. Trump denies any collusion by his campaign.

Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats told the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday that he had already seen evidence Russia was targeting US elections in November, when Republican control of the House of Representatives and Senate are at stake, plus a host of positions in state governments.

"Frankly, the United States is under attack," Coats said at an annual hearing on worldwide threats.

Russia would try to interfere in the 2018 US midterm elections by using social media to spread propaganda and misleading reports, much as it did in the 2016 campaign, intelligence chiefs said at the hearing.

One of the Russian businessman named on the indictment, Evgeny Prigozhin, said he was not upset about the development.

"The Americans are very emotional people, they see what they want to see. I have great respect for them. I am not at all upset that I am on this list. If they want to see the devil, let them," RIA quoted Prigozhin as saying.

Reuters

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