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Impeachment bid propels Trump to record war chest for 2020

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Rolling in it: Donald Trump is estimated to have raised more than $200m for his campaign already. Photo: Reuters

Rolling in it: Donald Trump is estimated to have raised more than $200m for his campaign already. Photo: Reuters

REUTERS

Rolling in it: Donald Trump is estimated to have raised more than $200m for his campaign already. Photo: Reuters

US president Donald Trump and the Republican Party are using the prospect of impeachment to raise a record election war chest, firing up supporters.

Party officials said there had been a "groundswell" of support from the rank and file in the days after Democrats in Congress announced an impeachment inquiry into the president over the Ukraine scandal. It looks set to spur Mr Trump to an extraordinary total during the 2020 campaign, which could ultimately hit $2bn (€1.8bn).

Mr Trump's campaign reported it had taken $15m in the 72 hours after Nancy Pelosi, the Democrat speaker of the House, announced the impeachment inquiry. Brad Parscale, the campaign manager, described it as "amazing".

But the more significant figure was that it included money from 50,000 new small donors, who were from all 50 states. The impeachment inquiry was launched after a CIA whistleblower raised the alarm about a July 25 telephone call between Mr Trump and Volodymyr Zelenskiy, the president of Ukraine.

Mr Trump is accused of pressuring Mr Zelenskiy to investigate Joe Biden, the Democrat front-runner, over business dealings his son Hunter had with an energy company in Ukraine. Both Bidens have denied any wrongdoing.

In the coming days, the scale of Mr Trump's war chest will become clear as a deadline to file totals with the Federal Election Commission approaches.

He is known to have already raised above $200m, which is more than the combined total for all two dozen Democrats who have launched 2020 White House campaigns.

However, in a new Ipsos poll, 64pc of Americans said the phone call with Mr Zelenskiy was a "serious problem".

Only 17pc said they were "surprised" by it. Just 3pc were "very surprised".

Telegraph.co.uk