Wednesday 19 June 2019

'Big' trade deal possible once UK 'gets rid of shackles', Trump says as he cranks up pressure for harder Brexit

Queen Elizabeth II greets US President Donald Trump as he arrives for the Ceremonial Welcome at Buckingham Palace, London, on day one of his three day state visit to the UK. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday June 3, 2019. See PA story ROYAL Trump. Photo credit should read: Victoria Jones/PA Wire
Queen Elizabeth II greets US President Donald Trump as he arrives for the Ceremonial Welcome at Buckingham Palace, London, on day one of his three day state visit to the UK. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday June 3, 2019. See PA story ROYAL Trump. Photo credit should read: Victoria Jones/PA Wire
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 03: Queen Elizabeth II smiles as she officially welcomes US President Donald Trump (L) and First Lady Melania Trump (L) during their visit on June 03, 2019 at Buckingham Palace in London, England. President Trump's three-day state visit will include lunch with the Queen, and a State Banquet at Buckingham Palace, as well as business meetings with the Prime Minister and the Duke of York, before travelling to Portsmouth to mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
(left to right) The Duchess of Cornwall, the Prince of Wales, Melania Trump, US President Donald Trump and Queen Elizabeth II arrive for the Ceremonial Welcome at Buckingham Palace, London, on day one of his three day state visit to the UK. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday June 3, 2019. See PA story ROYAL Trump. Photo credit should read: Victoria Jones/PA Wire
US President Donald Trump and his wife Melania are welcomed by Queen Elizabeth II and the Prince of Wales during the Ceremonial Welcome at Buckingham Palace, London, on day one of his three day state visit to the UK. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday June 3, 2019. See PA story ROYAL Trump. Photo credit should read: Yui Mok/PA Wire
Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

US President Donald Trump said during his visit to London on Monday that the United States and Britain could soon negotiate a "big" trade deal.

"Big Trade Deal is possible once U.K. gets rid of the shackles. Already starting to talk!" Trump wrote on Twitter.

"London part of trip is going really well. The Queen and the entire royal family have been fantastic. The relationship with the United Kingdom is very strong. Tremendous crowds of well wishers and people that love our country," he said.

Mr Trump earlier met Queen Elizabeth at Buckingham Palace.

In her speech, the Queen spoke of the "new challenges" the US and the UK face in the 21st century, and stressed the bonds between the two countries.

"As we face the new challenges of the 21st Century, the anniversary of D-Day reminds us of all that our countries have achieved together," she said

"After the shared sacrifices of the Second World War, Britain and the United States worked with other allies to build an assembly of international institutions, to ensure that the horrors of conflict would never be repeated.

"While the world has changed, we are forever mindful of the original purpose of these structures: nations working together to safeguard a hard-won peace."

The Queen also mentioned the US and UK's "strong cultural links and shared heritage" and said the two nations were "bound by the strength and breadth of our economic ties".

She continued: "Mr President, as we look to the future, I am confident that our common values and shared interests will continue to unite us.

"Tonight we celebrate an alliance that has helped to ensure the safety and prosperity of both our peoples for decades, and which I believe will endure for many years to come."

The Queen finished by inviting the room to raise a toast to the "continued friendship between our two nations, and to the health, prosperity and happiness of the people of the United States".

Donald Trump "supports Brexit being accomplished in a way that will not affect global economic and financial stability while also securing independence to the United Kingdom" the White House has said.

It issued a statement saying the US president is honoured to be back in the UK "during this important time of change and opportunity for its nations and people" and quoting him as stating: "A strong and independent United Kingdom, like a strong and independent United States, is truly a blessing on the world."

The statement continued: "The longstanding relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom is essential to our shared security and prosperity. As the United Kingdom continues to work toward a plan to leave the European Union, the United States pledges to maintain a strong relationship with both.

"The United States will continue to prepare for all outcomes and co-ordinate with governments, financial institutions, and international bodies to protect its interests."

Meanwhile, thousands of people are set to take part in protests across Ireland when Donald Trump visits the island later this week.

Mr Trump and his wife Melania arrived in the UK on Monday morning.

They were officially welcomed by the Queen at Buckingham Palace.

The couple are due to arrive in Ireland on Wednesday following their three-day state visit to the UK.

They will stay at Mr Trump's hotel and golf resort at Doonbeg in Co Clare.

The visit has prompted protests to be organised across Ireland.

The Stop Trump Ireland coalition will stage a national protest in Dublin on Thursday at the Garden of Remembrance.

On Tuesday evening, Together Against Trump will hold an outdoor event on Eyre Square in Galway and on Wednesday at Shannon airport a Shannonwatch peace camp will be erected for the duration of Mr Trump's stay in Ireland.

In Belfast, a protest will take place at the City Hall on Tuesday organised by the ExAct group of US residents living in Northern Ireland.

Meanwhile, a petition with 100,000 signatures will be delivered to Doonbeg by Friends of the Irish Environment in opposition to the construction of a coastal defence at the golf course.

Launching the planned protests outside the Irish Parliament on Monday, Memet Uludag, convener of Stop Trump Ireland, said they are exercising their democratic right.

"We are sending a simple message that Donald Trump and his toxic views are not welcome in Ireland," he said.

"We are using our democratic right to object to his visit, and we would like to say there is a different Ireland which is not in agreement with what Trump represents globally.

"I think there is a very significant opposition to Trump's visits from a very broad nature of people opposing his views and what he represents, and this is not protesting against the American people, today we saw American people actually joining with us in this photo call.

"We stand in solidarity with American women, Black Lives Matter, with the Me Too campaign, with the Mexicans who are separated from their children at the border."

Mr Uludag said he expects thousands to turn out at anti-Trump protests across the island of Ireland.

"There will be a protest in Shannon between 6-8pm, there are also events in Galway, Cork, Sligo, Derry and Belfast but we think Dublin will be the biggest event and we are expecting 4-6,000 people at that," he said.

Fatin Al Tamimi, chair of the Ireland Palestine Solidarity Campaign, will be among the protesters taking part in demonstrations in Ireland.

"We are protesting at Trump's visit here, we are saying he is not welcome," she said.

"Hopefully as many people as possible will show up to say no to Trump.

"He is not welcome in Ireland, the Irish Government shouldn't have invited him because he is a racist, a misogynist, Islamophobe, and an Apartheid supporter in Palestine.

"Many groups and people have united in Ireland in their opposition to Trump."

John Molyneux, secretary of the Irish Anti-War Movement, was also among the protesters.

"I feel really passionately against Donald Trump's visit to Ireland, Ireland is a wonderful country with a great tradition of resisting imperial oppression and I see Trump as the number one imperial oppressor in the world today so I really hope the Irish people come out and show that he is not welcome here."

Mr Trump will hold a bilateral meeting with Irish premier Leo Varadkar at Shannon Airport during his visit.

Last week, Mr Varadkar told the Dail parliament that he was looking forward to discussing free trade with the US president.

Mr Trump had been due to visit Ireland last November but the trip was postponed due to operational reasons.

He will also attend events in France to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day.

With additional reporting from the Press Association

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