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Nasa says astrology believers following wrong star sign


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While the 12 signs of the zodiac take their names from the constellations that the Sun appears to pass in the course of a year, a 13th has been put forward for inclusion

While the 12 signs of the zodiac take their names from the constellations that the Sun appears to pass in the course of a year, a 13th has been put forward for inclusion

While the 12 signs of the zodiac take their names from the constellations that the Sun appears to pass in the course of a year, a 13th has been put forward for inclusion

Devotees of astrology may have been following the wrong star signs for their whole lives, Nasa has suggested.

While the 12 signs of the zodiac take their names from the constellations that the Sun appears to pass in the course of a year, a 13th has been put forward for inclusion.

Ophiuchus, named after the Ancient Greek word for 'snake bearer', straddles the celestial equator and comes into line for 18 days between November 29 and December 17. In a post on the official Nasa website, which has gained traction this week, it said that Ophiuchus was the 13th constellation which the Sun passes, leading some astrologists to completely redraw the Zodiac calendar.

Horoscope fans fear that they may have been following the wrong guidance all their lives, with Ophiuchans said to be clever, flamboyant but power-hungry.

The realignment has affected other star signs.

Mandy Southgate, from Kent, said: "No way I'm an Aries. Taurus forever. I'm going to ignore Ophiuchus just like I ignored Pluto not being a planet."

"So I am no longer a Sagittarius, I'm now an Ophiuchus. Took me years to learn how to spell Sagittarius, now have to learn how to spell and pronounce Ophiuchus," joked Shaun Connolly, from Scotland.

Sally Kirkman, a self-styled "consultant to the stars" from Blackpool, told 'The Daily Telegraph': "No one is going to have Ophiuchus as their star sign, it means nothing. All the star signs remain as they have since ancient times."

Ophiuchus was originally spotted by the ancient Babylonians, about three millennia ago.

"Even according to the Babylonians' own ancient stories, there were 13 constellations in the zodiac," Nasa said.

"To make a tidy match with their 12-month calendar, the Babylonians ignored the fact that the Sun actually moves through 13 constellations, not 12. So the Babylonians picked one, Ophiuchus, to leave out."

Telegraph.co.uk