| 23°C Dublin

Men rushing for vasectomies after US Supreme Court ban on abortions

Close

Anti-abortion activists demonstrate outside the US Supreme Court in Washington. Photo: Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters

Anti-abortion activists demonstrate outside the US Supreme Court in Washington. Photo: Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters

US President Joe Biden participates in a virtual meeting with New York Governor Kathy Hochul while discussing reproductive health care, following the US Supreme Court ruling overturning the landmark Roe v Wade abortion decision. Photo: Tom Brenner/Reuters

US President Joe Biden participates in a virtual meeting with New York Governor Kathy Hochul while discussing reproductive health care, following the US Supreme Court ruling overturning the landmark Roe v Wade abortion decision. Photo: Tom Brenner/Reuters

US President Joe Biden participates in a virtual meeting with New York Governor Kathy Hochul while discussing reproductive health care, following the US Supreme Court ruling overturning the landmark Roe v Wade abortion decision. Photo: Tom Brenner/Reuters

US President Joe Biden participates in a virtual meeting with New York Governor Kathy Hochul while discussing reproductive health care, following the US Supreme Court ruling overturning the landmark Roe v Wade abortion decision. Photo: Tom Brenner/Reuters

/

Anti-abortion activists demonstrate outside the US Supreme Court in Washington. Photo: Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters

American men are rushing to get vasectomies in the wake of abortion bans in several states, doctors have claimed, citing a surge in requests.

More than half of US states have either imposed severe abortion bans or are shortly expected to following the Supreme Court’s decision to revoke the constitutional right to the procedure.

On Thursday, US president Joe Biden denounced the conservative-majority court for “outrageous behaviour”, backing a Senate rule-change that would allow Democrats to override Republican opposition and force through abortion rights legislation.

Since the Supreme Court ruling, dozens of urologists have reported a huge increase in men demanding sterilisation procedures.

The surge has been most notable in childless men under the age of 30.

Doug Stein, a doctor known as the “Vasectomy King” for his long-time advocacy of the procedure, said the spike in requests was “very, very noticeable” in the days following the Supreme Court decision.

His clinic is fully booked until the end of August, leading him to add additional days to his schedule to meet the demand.

“Many of the guys are saying that they have been thinking about a vasectomy for a while, and the (Supreme Court) decision was just that final factor that tipped them over the edge,” he told the Washington Post.

An analysis by the newspaper found doctors in some states reporting a 300 to 400pc increase in vasectomy consultations and a 200 to 250pc increase in web traffic around the procedure.

One doctor, John Curington, said “at least 60 or 70pc are mentioning the Supreme Court” ruling during their appointments.

Some, like Eric Nisi, a 29-year-old from Florida, said fears that states could next move to restrict access to contraception had driven them to register for a vasectomy.

Demand for vasectomies also surged in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, as well as the onset of the coronavirus pandemic.

Daily Digest Newsletter

Get ahead of the day with the morning headlines at 7.30am and Fionnán Sheahan's exclusive take on the day's news every afternoon, with our free daily newsletter.

This field is required

However, numerous doctors told the Washington Post the latest increase exceeded previous episodes.

Meanwhile, a hacking group claimed it had hacked into menstrual cycle tracking apps and deleted their data, amid fears big tech could help prosecutors identify abortions in states where it is now illegal.

The group Anonymous said it had “hacked and deleted” data from multiple period tracking apps “to avoid identifying possible abortion”. 

It came in response to fears that health data collected by the apps could be valuable to states pursuing criminal cases against abortion providers.

Period tracking app Flo has announced a new “anonymous mode” feature that will allow users to remove their identifying information from their profile.

Meanwhile, the maker of a drug used in medication abortions has told a federal judge that the Supreme Court’s ruling does not allow Mississippi to stop it from selling the pills in the state.

GenBioPro Inc, which makes a generic version of the drug mifepristone, said in a Thursday filing in Jackson Federal Court in Mississippi that the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) approval of the drug should override any state ban.

The Las Vegas-based company sued the state in 2020 to challenge regulations that restricted medication abortion specifically.

Mississippi is now set to ban nearly all abortions under a 2007 “trigger law” following the Supreme Court’s ruling which overturned the constitutional right to abortion.

GenBioPro said that law will create a “that much more direct and glaring conflict” with the FDA. (© Telegraph Media Group Ltd 2022)

Telegraph Media Group Limited [2022]


Related topics


Most Watched





Privacy