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How Donald Trump may have violated the Espionage Act without being a spy

While one part of the act does relate to spying, more typically it applies to the unauthorised gathering, possessing or transmitting of sensitive government information

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Former US president Donald Trump waves as he leaves Trump Tower in New York on his way to the New York attorney general's office for a deposition. Photo: Julia Nikhinson/AP

Former US president Donald Trump waves as he leaves Trump Tower in New York on his way to the New York attorney general's office for a deposition. Photo: Julia Nikhinson/AP

The FBI's unsealed search warrant for Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida. Photo: Jon Elswick/AP

The FBI's unsealed search warrant for Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida. Photo: Jon Elswick/AP

An aerial view of Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida. Photo: Steve Helber/AP

An aerial view of Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida. Photo: Steve Helber/AP

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Former US president Donald Trump waves as he leaves Trump Tower in New York on his way to the New York attorney general's office for a deposition. Photo: Julia Nikhinson/AP

THE federal court-authorised search of former president Donald Trump’s Florida estate has brought renewed attention to the obscure but infamous law known as the Espionage Act of 1917.

A section of the law was listed as one of three potential violations under Justice Department investigation.


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