Saturday 21 April 2018

Florida school shooting survivors on cover of Time magazine: 'Enough'

Student of Parkland high school have become public faces of national a gun control movement

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students Jaclyn Corin, Alex Wind, Emma González, Cameron Kasky and David Hogg appear on Time's cover for a story about young people driving the gun control debate Photo: TIME
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students Jaclyn Corin, Alex Wind, Emma González, Cameron Kasky and David Hogg appear on Time's cover for a story about young people driving the gun control debate Photo: TIME

Jeremy B White

Survivors of the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida, who are spearheading a national movement for gun control, are featured on the latest cover of Time magazine.

Under the headline 'Enough' the group of vocal and internet-savvy teens are the figureheads of a movement looking to redefine the gun control debate in the weeks since a gunman killed 17 people at their high school

Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students Jaclyn Corin, Alex Wind, Emma González, Cameron Kasky and David Hogg all appear on the cover, standing in for a student-driven movement for tougher gun regulations.

The corresponding story chronicles how young people have driven a resurgent push for new gun laws. In tweets, meetings and rallies, they have publicly urged elected officials in Washington and Tallahassee, Florida’s state capitol, to enact tougher gun restrictions.

Following the lead of their Florida counterparts, students around the country walked out of their schools to advocate for tougher gun laws. A “March For Our Lives” rally is planned for Saturday in Washington, DC, with similar marches planned across the country over the weekend.

The groundswell of gun control advocacy has already yielded some concrete results. Florida Governor Rick Scott has signed a gun control package, passed by the state’s Republican-controlled legislature, that raises the age for buying all firearms to 21 and allows courts to strip guns from people deemed to pose a threat to themselves or others.

Elected officials in Washington have so far not not followed suit. While Donald Trump initially shocked the political world by seeming to embrace measures that are anathema to the politically powerful National Rifle Association (NRA), he later moderated his stance and said he was in agreement with the NRA.

But corporate America has forged ahead, with major retailers like Walmart and Dick’s Sporting Goods announcing they would require all people purchasing guns to be 21.

Adding to that wave, banking and financial services corporation Citi announced this week that it would only partner with companies that require background checks to buy guns, restrict firearms sales to people who are under the age of 21 and do not sell high-capacity magazines or devices known as bump-stocks that enable more rapid firing.

“As a society, we all know that something needs to change. And as a company, we feel we must do our part”, Citi said in a statement.

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