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Digitally aged pictures of how Alcatraz escape gang might look now released by US Marshals

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Images of Clarence Anglin, John Anglin and Frank Morris from 1962 (top) and (bottom) digitally altered versions of the trio from now

Images of Clarence Anglin, John Anglin and Frank Morris from 1962 (top) and (bottom) digitally altered versions of the trio from now

Images of Clarence Anglin, John Anglin and Frank Morris from 1962 (top) and (bottom) digitally altered versions of the trio from now

Sixty years after an infamous escape from Alcatraz, prison police have released age-progressed images of the daring convicts.

Clarence Anglin, John Anglin and Frank Morris broke out of the San Francisco prison on June 11, 1962, where they were serving time for armed robberies.

They made it out after spending a year digging a tunnel with spoons, climbing up poles and evading guards before planning to take a raft back to the mainland.

But whether the trio made it to the other side has been a topic of mass debate.

The group, who were each serving time for armed robbery, dug a tunnel into the prison’s drainage system over a year-long period.

They left behind makeshift dummies, made from plaster, paint and hair, as decoys to give them a 10-hour window between their escape and discovery that they were missing.

After climbing along the prison’s roof they pushed off into the bay on a raft made from 50 prison-issued World War II-era raincoats.

Once they were reported missing the prison went into a full lockdown and a massive sea, air and land search was launched.

Federal officials concluded the group must have drowned after a sealed bag containing addresses and numbers was found in the water. A body was also spotted close to the Golden Gate bridge.

Yet speculation has circulated for years that they could have survived and lived under aliases, after evidence that the raft made it to Angel Island and reports that a car was stolen that night by three people.

The case, which inspired Clint Eastwood’s 1979 film Escape from Alcatraz, was given new life after a 2013 letter from a person claiming to be John Anglin.

The letter said he was alive but suffering from cancer, and offered to serve a year in prison in return for treatment.

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It remains unclear whether there have been any recent developments other than the age-progressed photographs.

“The ongoing US Marshals investigation of the 1962 escape from Alcatraz federal prison serves as a warning to fugitives: That regardless of time, we will continue to look for you and bring you to justice,” US marshals said in a statement. 

Telegraph Media Group Limited [2022]


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