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Democratic rivals go on attack to stop Bloomberg 'buying election'

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Target: Michael Bloomberg has come under attack. Photo: Getty Images

Target: Michael Bloomberg has come under attack. Photo: Getty Images

AFP via Getty Images

Target: Michael Bloomberg has come under attack. Photo: Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidates hoping to revive their flagging campaigns increasingly took aim at Mike Bloomberg, blasting their billionaire rival for trying to buy his way into the White House and raising questions about his commitment to racial equality.

Struggling to recover from poor showings in the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary, Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden took the lead in attacking Mr Bloomberg.

Mr Biden, the former vice-president, said on ABC's 'The View' that "I don't think you can buy an election", while Ms Warren took Mr Bloomberg to task for his 2008 comments that ending redlining, a discriminatory housing practice, helped trigger the economic meltdown.

Mr Biden and billionaire Tom Steyer also joined forces in slamming Bernie Sanders after the Vermont senator and self-described democratic socialist won New Hampshire and essentially tied for the lead in Iowa with Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana.

Mr Biden said Mr Sanders hadn't done enough to explain how he'd pay for his "Medicare for All" proposal to replace private insurance with a government-run programme.

Mr Steyer said that "refusal to tell us how he will pay for his plan adds unnecessary financial risk to achieving health care as a right for every person".

Voters, Mr Steyer said, "should have all the facts".

The sniping reflects the remarkably fluid state of the Democratic race even after two states that typically winnow presidential fields have already voted. The White House hopefuls are trying to blunt Mr Bloomberg, who gained attention by flooding the national airwaves with hundreds of millions of dollars in advertisements and is on the verge of being admitted into next week's presidential debate. And the lagging candidates are trying to prove that they still have the mettle to stay in the race, even if their path is becoming increasingly difficult.

Ms Warren told The Associated Press that she has raised $6m (€5.5m) since the February 3 Iowa caucuses, a haul that could silence questions about whether she will soon leave the campaign because of her disappointing showings so far. She called the race "wide open".

"There's a lot of froth," she said. "It's going to be a long process."

That's especially true as moderates are struggling to coalesce around a candidate. Mr Biden has long argued that he's the most electable, in part because his centrist approach has broad appeal and could make it easier for Democrats to defeat President Donald Trump. That's at risk of being undermined by his middling finish in Iowa and New Hampshire. He's now staking his campaign on success in the February 29 South Carolina primary, which is the first race in a state with a significant black population.

But before then, candidates will face voters in Nevada, which holds its Democratic caucuses next Saturday. Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar, whose moderate presidential campaign surpassed expectations in New Hampshire this week, raced to Nevada after a Senate vote on Thursday to try to keep momentum going.

"The political landscape is littered with people who raised more money than Amy Klobuchar," said Tom Nides, a former deputy secretary of state and Democratic donor who served as an intern on Capitol Hill with Ms Klobuchar when they were in college. "Her whole campaign strategy has been based on the fact that she's scrappy. She just grinds it out."

Ms Klobuchar's rise is inviting new scrutiny, especially from Mr Buttigieg, hoping to keep her from eating into his support among moderate Democrats.

Mr Biden received more bad news when Nevada's most politically powerful union, the casino workers' Culinary Union, said it wouldn't endorse any of the candidates before the state's caucuses.

He warned his supporters on Wednesday that an endorsement was unlikely, but the confirmation of that was still a blow.

Irish Independent