| 1.8°C Dublin

Musher forced out of Iditarod sled dog race after testing positive for Covid

Gunnar Johnson was withdrawn from the Alaska event, organisers said.

Close

The Ophir checkpoint of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race (Zachariah Hughes/AP)

The Ophir checkpoint of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race (Zachariah Hughes/AP)

The Ophir checkpoint of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race (Zachariah Hughes/AP)

A veteran musher was removed from the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race after he tested positive for coronavirus, organisers said.

Gunnar Johnson, 52, of Duluth, Minnesota, was withdrawn from the event at the McGrath, Alaska, checkpoint, the organisers said in a news release.

Iditarod race marshal Mark Nordman, working with epidemiologist Dr Jodie Guest, made the decision to remove Johnson, who is asymptomatic, based on the rules set in the race’s Covid-19 mitigation plan.

Johnson is incredibly disappointed and felt his dog team looked great, the organisers said.

Johnson had 14 dogs racing with him.

After the positive test, Johnson was removed from the checkpoint area and taken off the trail, the organisers said.

Close

The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is a gruelling challenge (Zachariah Hughes/AP)

The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is a gruelling challenge (Zachariah Hughes/AP)

The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is a gruelling challenge (Zachariah Hughes/AP)

Johnson, the former city attorney of Duluth who was participating in his third Iditarod, did not come into close contact with race personnel or community members, and he did not enter any buildings or community spaces in McGrath, the organisers said.

The Iditarod normally goes from the Anchorage area to Nome.

But because of the pandemic, mushers are travelling in a loop from Willow, about 50 miles north of Anchorage, to the ghost town of Iditarod, and then back to Willow for the finish.

Daily Digest Newsletter

Get ahead of the day with the morning headlines at 7.30am and Fionnán Sheahan's exclusive take on the day's news every afternoon, with our free daily newsletter.

This field is required

To avoid spreading Covid-19, mushers are breezing through most rural Alaska villages that serve as checkpoints and they are instead resting in tent camps outside towns.


Most Watched





Privacy