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We need public outrage to end the tragedy of Syrian conflict

Action is desperately needed to end the chaos of the war-torn country

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YOUNG PRIMARY CARE GIVERS: Ibrahim al-Ali in his wheelchair surrounded by his children, at the Deir Hassan camp in Idlib last week. The 33-year-old father-of-four was wounded every time he tried to escape Syria’s war. First he lost three fingers, then his hearing in one ear, then both legs and his eyes. Photo: Ahmad al-Atrash/AFP via Getty

YOUNG PRIMARY CARE GIVERS: Ibrahim al-Ali in his wheelchair surrounded by his children, at the Deir Hassan camp in Idlib last week. The 33-year-old father-of-four was wounded every time he tried to escape Syria’s war. First he lost three fingers, then his hearing in one ear, then both legs and his eyes. Photo: Ahmad al-Atrash/AFP via Getty

AFP via Getty Images

YOUNG PRIMARY CARE GIVERS: Ibrahim al-Ali in his wheelchair surrounded by his children, at the Deir Hassan camp in Idlib last week. The 33-year-old father-of-four was wounded every time he tried to escape Syria’s war. First he lost three fingers, then his hearing in one ear, then both legs and his eyes. Photo: Ahmad al-Atrash/AFP via Getty

Nine years on and the war still rages. Are we numb to the tragedy that is Syria? Even as the intensity of fighting and human suffering worsens again in Idlib, there is a deafening international silence.

After nine years of such unrelenting suffering perhaps we do not know what to feel. Scenes of people packing everything, losing everything, exhausted and shattered physically and psychologically have become devastatingly regular.

What is the difference between 2011, 2015 and 2020? People fleeing somewhere, anywhere that will be safer than where they were.