Thursday 22 February 2018

Number of Christians held by Isil rises to 220

Christian fighters of Sutoro (The Syriac Security Office) carry their weapons as they man a checkpoint in the town of Tel Tamr. Kurdish militia pressed an offensive against Islamic State in northeast Syria on Wednesday, cutting one of its supply lines from Iraq, as fears mounted for dozens of Christians abducted by the hardline group. Reuters
Christian fighters of Sutoro (The Syriac Security Office) carry their weapons as they man a checkpoint in the town of Tel Tamr. Kurdish militia pressed an offensive against Islamic State in northeast Syria on Wednesday, cutting one of its supply lines from Iraq, as fears mounted for dozens of Christians abducted by the hardline group. Reuters
Men use sledgehammers on a toppled statue in a museum at a location said to be Mosul in this still image taken from an undated video. Ultra-radical Islamist militants in northern Iraq have destroyed a priceless collection of statues and sculptures from the ancient Assyrian era, inflicting what an archaeologist described as incalculable damage to a piece of shared human history. Reuters

Zeina Karam

The number of Christians abducted by the Isil group in northeastern Syria has risen to 220 in the past three days, as militants round up more hostages from a chain of villages along a strategic river, activists said yesterday.

In Iraq, Isil released a video purportedly showing militants using sledgehammers to smash ancient artefacts in Iraq's northern city of Mosul, describing the relics as idols that must be removed.

This week's abductions of the Christian Assyrians in northeastern Syria is one of the largest hostage-takings by Isil since its blitz last year that captured large swaths of both Syria and Iraq last year. The fate of the captives was not known.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the militants picked up dozens more Christian Assyrians from 11 communities near the town of Tal Tamr in Hassakeh province.

The province, which borders Turkey and Iraq, has become the latest battleground in the fight against Isil in Syria. It is predominantly Kurdish but also has populations of Arabs and predominantly Christian Assyrians and Armenians.

Isil began abducting the Assyrians on Monday, when militants attacked a cluster of villages along the Khabur River, sending thousands of people fleeing to safer areas.

Younan Talia, a senior official with the Assyrian Democratic Organization, said Isil had raided 33 Assyrian villages, picking up as many as 300 people along the way. It was not possible to reconcile the numbers, and the fate of the hostages remained unclear.

State-run news agency SANA and an Assyrian activist group, the Assyrian Network for Human Rights in Syria, said the group had been moved to the Isil-controlled city of Shaddadeh, a predominantly Arab town south of the city of Hassakeh.

Irish Independent

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