Saturday 21 September 2019

Iran relents - and lets women into stadium to watch football

Female fans from other countries have previously been permitted to attend games at the Azadi Stadium.
Female fans from other countries have previously been permitted to attend games at the Azadi Stadium.

Helen Popper in Dubai

Iran yesterday allowed hundreds of local women to attend the Asian Champions League final in Tehran in a possible step towards ending women's decades-old exclusion from top soccer matches in the country.

The semi-official news agency Tasnim said an unspecified number of women had entered the Azadi Stadium to watch Persepolis seek to overturn a 2-0 first-leg deficit against Japan's Kashima Antlers and claim their first continental crown.

The news agency said fans around the stadium cheered as the women entered the stands set aside for them, which an official said had a capacity of 850 seats. The women had joined in with chanting in support of Persepolis, Iran's best-supported club.

Iranian women and girls have not been allowed to attend any men's sporting events in the country for much of the 39 years since the Islamic revolution, and have not been granted access to matches involving top clubs since 1981.

However, in a rare move last month, about 100 women were allowed to watch a friendly soccer match between Iran and Bolivia.

As 80,000 people gathered at the Azadi to watch Saturday's game, Iranian social media reports said most of the women who had been let into the stadium were relatives of players or members of Iran's female football and futsal teams and football federation employees.

Female fans from other countries have previously been permitted to attend games at the Azadi Stadium.

World soccer's governing body FIFA had demanded women be allowed to attend top-level games. Iranian campaign group Open Stadiums has been lobbying for access to venues for women in Iran, and representatives of the group met with FIFA general secretary Fatma Samoura last week to deliver a petition signed by more than 200,000 people.

Speaking before Saturday's game, a spokesperson for the group said overturning women's exclusion "has been our dream for decades"

"We are always excluded from public happiness and excitement," the spokesperson told reporters by e-mail on condition of anonymity.

The restrictions on Iranian women that were relaxed for the match against Bolivia were quickly reinstated under pressure from hardliners within the government.

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