Friday 24 November 2017

Gaddafi's son sentenced to death by firing squad in Libya

Saif Al-Islam (L), son of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, talking to reporters in Tripoli in 2011, and Abdullah Al-Senussi, then head of the Libyan Intelligence Service speaking to the media in Tripoli in this August 21 in the same year. Reuters
Saif Al-Islam (L), son of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, talking to reporters in Tripoli in 2011, and Abdullah Al-Senussi, then head of the Libyan Intelligence Service speaking to the media in Tripoli in this August 21 in the same year. Reuters
Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, son of late Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, attends a hearing behind bars in a courtroom in Zintan, Libya. Photo: Reuters
Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, son of late Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, attends a hearing behind bars in a courtroom in Zintan, Libya. Photo: Reuters
Abdullah al-Senussi , ex-spy chief in Muammar Gaddafi's government, sits behind bars during the hearing at a courtroom in Tripoli. Photo: Reuters

Easm Mohamed

A COURT in Libya has sentenced a son of Moammar Gaddafi to death by firing squad after convicting him of murder and inciting genocide during the 2011 uprising.

The Tripoli court that sentenced Seif al-Islam, who is being held by a militia that refuses to hand him over, also sentenced to death eight others, including former Libyan spy chief Abdullah al-Senoussi, who is in government custody.

It was unclear whether the sentences in the mass trial of 38 Gaddafi-era figures, only 29 of whom were present, would be carried out. Six others were sentenced to life in prison and four were cleared of charges.

US-based Human Rights Watch said the trial was "undermined by serious due process violations," and called on the Supreme Court to independently review the verdict.

"This trial has been plagued by persistent, credible allegations of fair trial breaches that warrant independent and impartial judicial review," said Joe Stork, deputy Middle East and North Africa director. "The victims of the serious crimes committed during the 2011 uprising deserve justice, but that can only be delivered through fair and transparent proceedings."

Libya has slid into chaos since the overthrow and killing of Gaddafi, who ruled the country for four decades. It is now bitterly divided between an elected parliament and government cornered in the country's east, with little power on the ground, and an Islamist militia-backed government in the west that has seized the capital, Tripoli.

Irish Independent

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