Thursday 18 January 2018

'Koran lawyer' search

A man accused of plotting to derail a train in Canada with support from al-Qa'ida is having difficulty finding a lawyer because he is insisting that they use the Koran as a reference in court.

Chiheb Esseghaier said he did not recognise the secular authority of Canada's Criminal Code. He was told to continue his search and will next appear on June 25.

Mr Esseghaier (30) was arrested in connection with a plot to derail a train between New York City and Montreal.

STINKY SOCKS BEAT BITE

Scientists say there might be a potent new tool to fight malaria – the stench of human feet.

Researchers found that mosquitoes infected with the tropical disease were more attracted to human odours from a dirty sock than those that did not carry malaria.

Insects carrying malaria parasites were three times more likely to be drawn to the stinky socks.

The new finding may help create traps that target only malaria-carrying mosquitoes, researchers say.

CAR THIEF RETURNS BABY

A thief stole a car with a baby still in the back seat but then returned a few minutes later with the child.

The baby's mother left her daughter outside the vehicle but her five-year-old nephew and 14-month-old son remained in the back, while she made a delivery in Tiverton in Devon.

But a thief opened the rear door of the car and pulled the nephew out before driving off. He then returned to remove the child seat with the boy and dumped it on the pavement. The suspect jumped back into the car, drove off and has not been seen since.

LONGEST WORD LET GO

A tweak to laws in the German state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania to conform with EU regulations has caused an unexpected casualty: the longest word in the language.

The Rindfleischetikettierungsueberwachungsaufgabenuebertragungsgesetz is no more. The "law delegating beef label monitoring" was introduced in 1999 as part of measures against mad-cow disease, but it was removed because EU regulations have changed.

CHURCH WINE WHINE

With no miracle in sight, Roman Catholic churches are being asked to ration wine in the latest shortage to illustrate Venezuela's economic troubles.

"We're asking the priests and bishops to ration wine and look for alternatives during this emergency," said Jose Antonio Da Conceicao, a national church official.

Irish Independent

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