Wednesday 19 December 2018

In Pictures: Insight spacecraft lands on Mars

From left, NASA officials Jim Bridenstine, Michael Watkins, Tom Hoffman, Bruce Banerdt, Andrew Klesh and Elizabeth Barrett make statements under a photograph sent from Mars by the InSight lander at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Monday, Nov. 26, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
From left, NASA officials Jim Bridenstine, Michael Watkins, Tom Hoffman, Bruce Banerdt, Andrew Klesh and Elizabeth Barrett make statements under a photograph sent from Mars by the InSight lander at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Monday, Nov. 26, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
From left, NASA officials Jim Bridenstine, Michael Watkins, Tom Hoffman, Bruce Banerdt, Andrew Klesh and Elizabeth Barrett celebrate the Mars landing of InSight during a press conference at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Monday, Nov. 26, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
James Bridenstine (L), Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), speaks along Michael Watkins, JPL Director, Project Manager Tom Hoffman and scientists Bruce Banerdt, Andrew Klesh and Elizabeth Barrett after the landing of spacecraft InSight on the surface of Mars, in Pasadena, California, U.S. November 26, 2018. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Bruce Banerdt (C), InSight Principal Investigator, NASA JPL, Hallie Gengl, Data Visualization Developer, NASA JPL, (R), and other NASA InSight team members celebrate after the first image of Mars from the Mars InSight lander are shown at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, U.S., November 26, 2018 NASA/Bill Ingalls/Handout via REUTERS
Astronauts on the International Space Station congratulate Michael Watkins (L), JPL Director, Project Manager Tom Hoffman and scientists Bruce Banerdt and Andrew Klesh (R) after the landing of the spacecraft InSight on the surface of Mars, in Pasadena, California, U.S. November 26, 2018. REUTERS/Mike Blake
James Bridenstine (L), Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) watches a replay of the celebration with Michael Watkins, JPL Director, Project Manager Tom Hoffman and scientists Bruce Banerdt and Andrew Klesh after the landing of the spacecraft InSight on the surface of Mars in Pasadena, California, U.S. November 26, 2018. REUTERS/Mike Blake
InSight project manager Tom Hoffman points at an image sent from the InSight lander after the space craft landed on Mars in the mission support area of the space flight operation facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Monday, Nov. 26, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif. (AP Photo/(Al Seib /Los Angeles Times via AP, Pool)
NASA JPL engineers Julie Wertz-Chen (L), and Aline Zimmer, (C), react after receiving confirmation that the Mars InSight lander successfully touched down on the surface of Mars, at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, U.S., November 26, 2018 NASA/Bill Ingalls/Handout via REUTERS
Female engineers from NASA celebrate in the space flight operation facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) after the spaceship InSight landed on the surface of Mars, from Pasadena, California, U.S. November 26, 2018. Al Seib/Pool via REUTERS
People react as they watch on a video screen the spaceship InSight, NASA's first robotic lander dedicated to studying the deep interior of Mars, land on the planet's surface after a six-month journey, in Times Square in New York City, U.S., November 26, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
NASA engineers Kris Bruvold (L) and Sandy Krasner react in the space flight operation facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as the spaceship InSight lands on the surface of Mars after a six-month journey, at JPL in Pasadena, California, U.S. November 26, 2018. Al Seib/Pool via REUTERS
NASA's InSight Mars lander acquired this image of the area in front of the lander using its lander-mounted, Instrument Context Camera (ICC) with the ICC image field of view of 124 x 124 degrees, on Mars, November 26, 2018. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout via REUTERS
NASA engineers Kris Bruvold (L) and Sandy Krasner react in the space flight operation facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as the spaceship InSight lands on the surface of Mars after a six-month journey, in Pasadena, California, U.S. November 26, 2018. Al Seib/Pool via REUTERS
NASA engineers Kris Bruvold (L) and Sandy Krasner react in the space flight operation facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as the spaceship InSight lands on the surface of Mars after a six-month journey, in Pasadena, California, U.S. November 26, 2018. Al Seib/Pool via REUTERS

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