Wednesday 21 February 2018

Flight MH370 'may be found in days' after new signals are detected

Orion captain Flt Lt Benn Carroll speaks to reporters after returning to base in Perth, Australia, from a search mission for debris from missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370
Orion captain Flt Lt Benn Carroll speaks to reporters after returning to base in Perth, Australia, from a search mission for debris from missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370

Jonathan Pearlman in Sydney

The search zone for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane has been limited to a narrow strip of the Indian Ocean, with the authorities confident they will find the aircraft "in a matter of days" after two new underwater signals were detected.

The latest signals, believed to be from the plane's black box locator beacon, follow two previous sets of pulses detected over the weekend.

They have all been heard within an area about 20 miles long and 10 miles wide, some 650 miles off the north-west coast of Australia, although a final search zone is yet to be demarcated.

The authorities said an Australian ship finally regained contact with the pulses on Tuesday, with one set of signals at 4.27pm, local time, lasting five minutes and 32 seconds, and another at 10.17pm, lasting seven minutes.

The new signals were "very weak" but "very stable, distinct and clear". It is believed the beacon's batteries, which are three days past a 30-day expiry date, are running out of life.

All the signals have been detected along a narrow strip of the Indian Ocean in an area known as Wharton Basin, a mostly flat underwater region.

The basin's ocean floor has thick layers of silt, but experts said an object with a large surface area – such as the fuselage of a plane – would not be deeply buried.

Angus Houston, the search coordinator, said authorities would soon send an unmanned submarine to try to sight wreckage and confirm the location of the Boeing 777, which disappeared on March 8 with 239 passengers and crew on board.

Mr Houston, a retired air chief marshal in the Australian air force, said he believed the plane would be found "in the not too distant future," adding: "I'm now optimistic that we will find the aircraft, or what is left of the aircraft.

"Hopefully with lots of transmissions we'll have a tight, small area and hopefully in a matter of days we will be able to find something on the bottom that might confirm that this is the last resting place of MH370," he said.

LOCATION

The latest signals did not feature two pulses heard on Saturday and believed to be from the separate "pingers" on the black box's flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder. Authorities believe it is possible one of the "pingers" has already died.

"It is important that we gather as much information to fix the possible location of the aircraft while the pingers are still transmitting," Mr Houston said.

Prof Charitha Pattiaratchi, from the University of Western Australia, said the waters in Wharton Basin were not particularly rough but little was known about the ocean floor, which had not been charted since an international expedition in the 1960s. (© Daily Telegraph, London)

Irish Independent

Promoted Links

Today's news headlines, directly to your inbox every morning.

Promoted Links

Editors Choice

Also in World News