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Thursday 18 January 2018

Fake bones scammer

A Vietnamese man claiming paranormal powers has been arrested on suspicion of faking the remains of soldiers killed and missing during the Vietnam war in order to claim more than €350,000 in reward money.

The case came to light after a military forensic team analysed nine sets of supposed Vietnamese human remains he had helped to recover that turned out to be animal bones.

WAR OVER TOMB MOVE

A decision to remove the inscription "known unto God" from the Tomb of the Australian Unknown Soldier has been dropped after a public outcry.

The sandstone war memorial opened in 1941 to commemorate Australians killed in World War I. It had been proposed to replace the phrase "known unto God" with the inscription: "We do not know this Australian's name, we never will."

BITE SHOWS INNOCENCE

A New Jersey man imprisoned for nearly two decades for a murder he says he did not commit is free on bail after successfully challenging the bite-mark evidence used to convict him.

Gerard Richardson (48) was released yesterday in Newark. He was convicted in 1995 of the murder of 19-year-old Monica Reyes. A recent DNA test requested by the Innocence Project revealed that the bite mark contained the DNA of a different man.

NUMBER'S NOT UP YET

A convenience store clerk in Florida can thank his mobile phone for stopping a bullet fired at his chest during an attempted robbery, police have said.

"He was very lucky," said Lieutenant Scott Allen of the Winter Garden Police Department.

SCARY ONLINE CONS

As pre-Halloween witches and ghouls sprout up on US lawns, experts are warning people to be wary of modern occult scammers who have moved online to hawk virtual voodoo dolls, revenge spells and otherwise "haunted" items.

While the idea of spending money for a magic spell has been around for centuries, experts say the anonymity of online transactions can encourage people to fall for the con.

JOBS' HOME PROTECTED

The Silicon Valley home where Apple co-founder Steve Jobs grew up and built some of his first computers is now on Los Altos's list of historic properties.

Any proposed renovations to the ranch-style home now require special permission.

Irish Independent

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