Sunday 22 April 2018

Spain hopes Catalans disregard instruction from their regional leaders - minister

MARCHING TO A showdown: The Catalan regional leadership, with Carles Puigdemont centre, lead a march of Catalan pro-independence groups in Barcelona yesterday. Photo: Lluis Gene/Getty
MARCHING TO A showdown: The Catalan regional leadership, with Carles Puigdemont centre, lead a march of Catalan pro-independence groups in Barcelona yesterday. Photo: Lluis Gene/Getty

Elizabeth Piper

Spanish Foreign Minister Alfonso Dastis said on Sunday he hoped that people in Catalonia would disregard any instruction from the regional leadership if Spain moves to suspend the region's autonomy.

"All the government is trying to do, and reluctantly, is to reinstate the legal order, to restore the constitution but also the Catalan rules and proceed from there," he told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show.

"We are going to establish the authorities who are going to rule the day-to-day affairs of Catalonia according to the Catalan laws and norms ... I hope everyone will disregard whatever instructions they will be planning to give because they will not have the legal authority to do that."

Meanwhile, the Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont said Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy's attempt to "humiliate" Catalonia is an "attack on democracy".

He made a veiled independence threat, telling politicians to counter Spain's planned takeover.

Mr Puigdemont spoke out after Mr Rajoy said he wants the country's senate to give him direct power to dissolve the regional Catalan government and call an election as soon as possible.

Mr Rajoy said after a cabinet meeting that the central government needs to take the unprecedented step of assuming control of Catalonia to "restore order" in the face of a secession effort backed by the regional government.

He is proposing that the powers of Catalan officials be taken over by central government ministers.

Mr Rajoy's government is activating a previously untapped constitutional article to take control of Catalonia.

The move is aimed at blocking the independence movement that has gained pace since a disputed October 1 referendum on separating Catalonia from Spain.

Mr Puigdemont wants the regional parliament to debate and vote on how to respond to what he called the Spanish government's "attempt to wipe out" Catalonia's autonomy.

In a televised address late on Saturday, he called plans by Mr Rajoy to replace him and his cabinet an "attempt to humiliate" Catalonia and an "attack on democracy".

His comments were a veiled threat to push ahead with an independence declaration for the prosperous region in north-eastern Spain.

They came after he joined a large protest in Barcelona on Saturday where many were aghast at the plans announced earlier in the day by Mr Rajoy.

Mr Puigdemont called Mr Rajoy's move the "the worst attack" on Catalan people and institutions since General Francisco Franco abolished Catalonia's regional government in 1939.

Online Editors

Today's news headlines, directly to your inbox every morning.

Editors Choice

Also in World News