Wednesday 24 October 2018

Sacré bleu! Turquoise-coloured wine making inroads in France

The fragrant wine has a sweet, mild taste, making it a popular aperitif or cocktail drink which would pair well with seafood such as oysters. Picture posed
The fragrant wine has a sweet, mild taste, making it a popular aperitif or cocktail drink which would pair well with seafood such as oysters. Picture posed

James Crisp

France has become a country of red, white and blue wine with the launch of a completely natural, turquoise-coloured variety of its favourite tipple.

Blue Nun may be a total non-non in the land of Chateau Lafite but a wine "in the colours of the sea" is now on sale in the port city of Sete in the south of France.

The "100pc natural" wine begins life as a traditional white but gets its blue tinge after being passed through a pulp of red grape skin that turns blue thanks to the natural pigment anthocyanin.

It required stiff resolve, however, for the blue wine to gain a foothold in a country where wine is viewed as a cultural heritage and which resisted the lure of arriviste rosé for more than a century.

Rene Le Bail, a Gallic entrepreneur, had to shift production to the more laissez-faire Spain after his fellow countrymen refused to make his wine.

Now he is triumphantly selling the Almeira-made drink in his homeland - but he still dreams of convincing a local vineyard to take the plunge, grow his grapes, and make the wine officially French.

Some 35,000 bottles of Vindingo, a chardonnay selling for about €12, are already on sale in Sete but it will soon be making inroads into the wine capital region of Bordeaux. Mr Le Bail said that the sales had already surpassed the forecasts of Mediterra Vin, his company.

The fragrant wine has a sweet, mild taste, making it a popular aperitif or cocktail drink which would pair well with seafood such as oysters. (© Daily Telegraph, London)

Telegraph.co.uk

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