Monday 23 October 2017

Paris attack terrorists 'had links to extremists in Britain'

Several people of Moroccan origin based in Birmingham linked to the Paris attackers

This undated image made available in the Islamic State's English-language magazine Dabiq, shows Belgian national Abdelhamid Abaaoud. Abaaoud, the child of Moroccan immigrants who grew up in the Belgian capital's Molenbeek-Saint-Jean neighborhood, was identified by French authorities on Monday Nov. 16, 2015, as the presumed mastermind of the terror attacks last Friday in Paris that killed over a hundred people and injured
This undated image made available in the Islamic State's English-language magazine Dabiq, shows Belgian national Abdelhamid Abaaoud. Abaaoud, the child of Moroccan immigrants who grew up in the Belgian capital's Molenbeek-Saint-Jean neighborhood, was identified by French authorities on Monday Nov. 16, 2015, as the presumed mastermind of the terror attacks last Friday in Paris that killed over a hundred people and injured

The Isil-inspired terrorists who attacked Paris last month killing 130 people had links to people in Britain, it has been reported.

Several people suspected of having connections to Abdelhamid Abaaoud, the Islamic State militant and alleged ringleader of the Nov 13 attacks, are based in Britain, according to two Western officials, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Abdelhamid Abaaoud
Abdelhamid Abaaoud

The people were said to be of Moroccan origin and based in the Birmingham area. There were seven coordinated terror attacks in Paris carried out by militants, killing at least 130 people.

Adding to fears of a link between the Paris killers and a UK-based terror cell, it has also been reported both that one of the Paris attack terrorists had previously visited Britain and that a string of phone calls were made to Birmingham in the run up to the attack.

There have been several links between Islamist extremism and Birmingham. Junaid Hussain, a 21-year-old computer hacker from Birmingham, was killed in a US drone attack in Syria in August.

His wife has claimed she was “proud” he was killed by Allah’s “biggest enemy”. Sally Jones, a former punk rocker and mother-of-two, described the coalition forces fighting Isil as “Crusaders” who would never win even when they kill fighters.

Mark Rowley, Britain's most senior counterterror officer said last month that there was a determination by Isil to attack across Europe.

“You would be expecting us and the security services to be working flat out to look for any possible links and connections of that network to anything in the UK," he said.

“I can give you 100 per cent assurance we are doing that but it would be wrong to discuss the detail of what we are or are not finding.”

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