Saturday 17 March 2018

Ikea tells teens to stop holding illegal sleepovers in its stores

Swedish furniture giant Ikea.
Swedish furniture giant Ikea.

Adam Boult

Ikea is attempting to crack down on a new irksome trend which sees groups of teens visiting its stores during the day, then hiding on the premises and staying there all night.

The first known illegal-Ikea-sleepover was staged last year by two pranksters from Belgium named  Florian Van Hecke and Bram Geirnaert, who camped out in their local store and filmed themselves running around, jumping on furniture and sleeping in display beds.

The video of their prank, titled 'Two idiots at night in Ikea', went viral, picking up 1.7 million views on YouTube and inspiring numerous copycat Ikea sleepovers - 10 so far this year, according to the BBC.

In the latest incident two 14-year-old girls were caught attempting to spend the night in a branch of Ikea in Jönköping, Sweden.

Ikea spokesman Jakob Holmström told Aftonbladet: "Due to the girls' young age, we have chosen not to make a police report. Instead, we have spoken with their parents ... to resolve the situation.

"We hope that this trend will slow," he added. "We do not see what it is fun about it."

An Ikea spokesperson told the BBC: "We appreciate that people are interested in Ikea and want to create fun experiences, however the safety and security of our co-workers and customers is our highest priority and that's why we do not allow sleepovers in our stores."

In 2015 Ikea in the Netherlands barred members of the public from holding games of hide-and-seek in its stores after 19,000 people signed up to a Facebook group promoting a game at a branch in Amsterdam.

A spokesperson said at the time: “In general we are happy that our customers are playful and want to have fun together with friends and family.

“But unfortunately this hide-and-seek phenomenon has reached proportions where we can no longer guarantee the security of those who are playing or our customers and employees.”

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