Wednesday 13 December 2017

Hollande affair: Former French First Lady to write tell-all book

Valerie Trierweiler, former French first lady, holds a child as she visits a slum in Mumbai
Valerie Trierweiler, former French first lady, holds a child as she visits a slum in Mumbai
France's former first lady, Valerie Trierweiler (C), sits a child in her lap as she talks to health workers and children during a visit to the Ekta Nagar slums in the Mandala area of Mumbai
France's former first lady, Valerie Trierweiler (C), sits a child in her lap as she talks to health workers and children during a visit to the Ekta Nagar slums in the Mandala area of Mumbai
Valerie Trierweiler (C), former companion of French President Francois Hollande, walks through a street during her visit to a slum in Mumbai
Valerie Trierweiler, former companion of French President Francois Hollande, walks through a street during her visit to a slum in Mumbai
Valerie Trierweiler, former French first lady, holds a child as she visits a slum in Mumbai
Valerie Trierweiler, former companion of French President Francois Hollande, fixes her hair as she visits a Society for Nutrition, Education and Health Action (SNEHA) centre at a slum in Mumbai
France's former first lady, Valerie Trierweiler (C), sings during a birthday celebration of a child during a visit to the Ekta Nagar slums in the Mandala area of Mumbai

The deposed French First Lady Valérie Trierweiler is thinking of writing a book on her 20 months as unmarried partner of the President of the Republic.

In interviews with Paris Match and Le Parisien published today, and set to appear at the weekend, Trierweiler, 48, says she "fell from a skyscraper" when she learned that President François Hollande was having an affair with an actress.

Trierweiler Loses First Lady Status

"I heard rumours of course but you hear rumours about everyone,” she told Paris Match, her own employer.

"I hear them about myself all the time. I paid no attention. When I found out, it was as if I had fallen from a sky-scraper."

In her first interviews since Hollande ended their seven-year partnership last Saturday, Trierweiler told Paris Match and the weekend magazine of Le Parisien that she was considering writing a book about her experiences in the Elysée.

"I didn’t like the corridor of power," she said. "After a time, you have no life left. We didn’t react to power in the same way. Something broke. I would have preferred a normal life. We might then still be together."

Trierweiler insists that she and Hollande remain on good terms and that he sent texts and made phone calls to inquire after her health during her humanitarian trip to India this week. She complains, however, about the curt 18-word message, expressing no regrets or sorrow, with which the President severed their relationship last weekend.

"Eighteen words is almost one word for each month we spent together since he was elected," she told Le Parisien. "You need two people to fall in love but only one to break up."

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