Saturday 21 April 2018

Glitter arrest only first of many as Savile inquiry widens

Former British pop star Gary Glitter returns to his home in London. Glitter was arrested on Sunday as part of an investigation into allegations of child sex abuse by the late BBC presenter Jimmy Savile, the BBC said. Photo: Reuters
Former British pop star Gary Glitter returns to his home in London. Glitter was arrested on Sunday as part of an investigation into allegations of child sex abuse by the late BBC presenter Jimmy Savile, the BBC said. Photo: Reuters

Sam Marsden

DETECTIVES are poised to make further arrests in the Jimmy Savile sex abuse investigation after they held Gary Glitter, the former pop star convicted of child sex offences, for questioning.

The 68-year-old has been detained by detectives from Operation Yewtree, Scotland Yard's inquiry into alleged child sexual exploitation by the late 'Jim'll Fix It' presenter and others.

The 1970s pop star was arrested on suspicion of "sexual offences" at his home in Marylebone, north London, and taken to a police station in the city.

He was seen leaving his home accompanied by a detective before being driven away. He made no comment.

Later, a team of detectives searched Glitter's house and seized a number of items which were carried out in a black sports bag and a garbage bag.

Yesterday's dramatic arrest is the first by the newly formed taskforce, but police have made it clear that other suspects will also face questioning in the coming days and weeks. Glitter was released 10 hours later.

The arrest widens a scandal that has already damaged the reputation of the BBC and the legacy of Savile, the former DJ who was one of the broadcaster's top show hosts.

Victims

The London Metropolitan Police declined to say what led to his arrest, which followed claims Glitter raped a girl in Savile's dressing room in front of the television presenter.

Scotland Yard has launched a criminal investigation into allegations that Savile was part of a sex ring, with other members who are still alive.

The Met police's investigation involves 400 separate lines of inquiry and more than about 300 alleged victims.

Earlier this month, it was alleged that Glitter raped a girl of 13 in his dressing room at BBC's television centre.

The attack, which occurred in the 1970s, allegedly took place as Savile was groping a 14-year-old in the same room.

The allegations were made by Karin Ward, a former pupil of a Surrey school, where Savile is accused of preying on under-age girls.

She waived her anonymity to tell an ITV documentary screened at the start of this month how the 'Jim'll Fix It' star was working with Glitter, a convicted paedophile. Glitter, real name Paul Gadd, was said to have denied the allegations.

A Met Police spokesman said: "Officers working on Operation Yewtree have today, 28 October, arrested a man in his 60s.

In 2009, Savile, who died aged 84 last year, defended Glitter, who has been convicted of downloading child pornography in Britain and abusing children in Vietnam.

Savile said: "What's Gary Glitter done wrong? Well, nothing really. He's just sat at home watching dodgy films."

Glitter was convicted in Vietnam in March 2006 of "obscene acts" with two girls aged 11 and 12, and released from prison in August 2008.

Having been turned away from Hong Kong and Thailand, he returned to Britain.

• Meanwhile, a relative of shamed BBC presenter Jimmy Savile claims she was sexually abused by the late broadcaster as a child.

Caroline Robinson (49) is the great niece of the late 'Top of the Pops' presenter who claims she was sexually abused by Savile at a family gathering when she was only 12 years old. She claims he abused her again aged 15.

"They both happened during a family gathering. It was not as though I was on my own. There were members of the family there as well," she told Sky News.

"After it happened when I was 12, I spoke to my grandmother, I told her what Jimmy had done. Her reply was, 'It's only Jimmy, it doesn't matter, I'll sort it out'."

Ms Robinson claims that many people knew about the abuse but said nothing because of what they stood to gain by being associated with Mr Savile's name. (© Daily Telegraph, London)

Irish Independent

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