Monday 20 November 2017

Glamping it up at Glastonbury

Amanda bell, 26 and Yasmin Eskandary, 27 arrive on the second day of Glastonbury music festival. Photo: Reuters
Amanda bell, 26 and Yasmin Eskandary, 27 arrive on the second day of Glastonbury music festival. Photo: Reuters

Belinda Goldsmith Pilton

HOW do you turn a farm in a rural idyl into a tented city overnight?

Why, by the magic of Glastonbury of course.

Yesterday, thousands of multicoloured fans flocked to the venerable site in Pilton, about 130 miles southwest of London, which has morphed into the world's largest open-air music festival.

There, megastars like the Rolling Stones will perform alongside more eclectic acts like chanting monks.

The event that started as a hippy retreat in rural Somerset in 1970 has grown into a massive, five-day festival featuring about 2,000 acts on 58 stages attended by more than 135,000 people.

While veteran rockers the Rolling Stones are the major act at this year's festival, founder Michael Eavis has ensured the event stays true to its alternative roots.

As well as its megastars, Glastonbury is known for its mud.

"Bring your wellies, it's raining," one camper told BBC radio last night.

Whatever the weather, the army of music fans descending on Glastonbury were determined to enjoy themselves, having paid £205 (€239) each for tickets.

And campers reluctant to rough it had the option of 'glamping' with ready-pitched tents, golf buggies and champagne on ice.

Irish Independent

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