Wednesday 22 November 2017

Emotional scenes as Manchester comes to a standstill for minute's silence

People observe a minute's silence in St Ann's Square, Manchester, to remember the victims of the terror attack in the city earlier this week. (PA)
People observe a minute's silence in St Ann's Square, Manchester, to remember the victims of the terror attack in the city earlier this week. (PA)
People observe a minute's silence in St Ann's Square, Manchester, to remember the victims of the terror attack in the city earlier this week. (PA)
People observe a minute's silence in St Ann's Square, Manchester, to remember the victims of the terror attack in the city earlier this week. (PA)
People observe a minute's silence in St Ann's Square, Manchester, to remember the victims of the terror attack in the city earlier this week. (PA)

Robin Schiller and Nicola Anderson

The city of Manchester came to a standstill once again this morning as they mourned those who lost their lives and were seriously injured in Monday night's terror attack.

Thousands of people lined the streets around St Ann's Square as the UK observer a national minute's silence for the 22 dead and 59 injured.

Among those paying their respects were Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham, Lord Mayor of the City Eddie Newman and council leader Sir Richard Leese.

As the large crowd- many of whom took time out from their jobs - observed the minute's silence, 22 balloons for those who tragically lost their lives were released into the blue sky above.

The silence ended with a resounding round of applause, while one man shouted 'Well done Manchester' as heavily armed police officers carrying sub-machine guns watched on.

Following the minute of silence a local woman, holding a bunch of flowers, began singing the Oasis song Don't Look Back in Anger and was joined by hundreds in the crowd.

Speaking after the vigil, Lydia Bernsmeier-Rullow said: "Don't look back in anger, we can't look back in anger, that's what this is about and we have to look forward.  We're all going to get on with it because that's what Manchester does," she said.

Paramedics who responded to Monday night's atrocity also arrived after the minutes silence to lay flowers in memory of those injured and who kept their lives.

In a stark reminder of the current critical terror alert, as the city stood in silence the Greater Manchester Police bomb squad responded to an incident at Linby Street, Hulme, around 3km from the shrine.

GM Police confirmed that a bomb disposal unit attended the scene, but it is too early to say if the operation is linked to Monday night's terror attack.

Flags will remain at half mast at Government buildings until Thursday evening, a statement from the Prime Minister said.

Meanwhile, the Queen has arrived at the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital in the last few minutes to meet with staff and young victims of the terror attack.

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