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Crash co-pilot was treated for 'suicidal tendencies'

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Rescue workers are seen near debris at the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

Rescue workers are seen near debris at the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

REUTERS

Andreas Lubitz, who deliberately crashed the Germanwings plane with 149 passengers into the Alps, had been expecting a baby with his partner. Photo: Getty Images

Andreas Lubitz, who deliberately crashed the Germanwings plane with 149 passengers into the Alps, had been expecting a baby with his partner. Photo: Getty Images

Getty Images

French Gendarme Bruno Hermignies stands by a bulldozer clearing a path to the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in the mountains, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

French Gendarme Bruno Hermignies stands by a bulldozer clearing a path to the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in the mountains, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

REUTERS

French Gendarme Bruno Hermignies stands by a bulldozer clearing a path to the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in the mountains, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

French Gendarme Bruno Hermignies stands by a bulldozer clearing a path to the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in the mountains, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

REUTERS

A French rescue worker inspects the debris from the Germanwings Airbus A320 at the site of the crash, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

A French rescue worker inspects the debris from the Germanwings Airbus A320 at the site of the crash, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

REUTERS

Debris from the Germanwings Airbus A320 is seen at the site of the crash, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

Debris from the Germanwings Airbus A320 is seen at the site of the crash, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

REUTERS

A French rescue worker inspects the debris from the Germanwings Airbus A320 at the site of the crash, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

A French rescue worker inspects the debris from the Germanwings Airbus A320 at the site of the crash, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

REUTERS

A French rescue worker inspects the debris from the Germanwings Airbus A320 at the site of the crash, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

A French rescue worker inspects the debris from the Germanwings Airbus A320 at the site of the crash, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

REUTERS

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Rescue workers are seen near debris at the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps. Photo: Reuters

Co-pilot Andreas Lubitz, who deliberately crashed the Germanwings Airbus into the French Alps, was in therapy for suicidal tendencies before getting his pilot's licence, Germany's state prosecutor has said.

Lubitz (27) was being treated by a psychotherapist, said Christoph Kumpa.

Mr Kumpa added: "He was being treated by a psychotherapist for what is documented as being suicidal tendencies at that time."

He said there had also been several visits to doctors right up until the time of the crash but these did not involve suicidal tendencies.

No suicide note "or anything like that" was found in searches of Lubitz's German residences, Mr Kumpa said.

There was also nothing in his personal, family or professional background to provide any hints "about his motivation", Mr Kumpa added.

Illness

He also said that Lubitz had not been suffering from any "medical illness".

Black box cockpit voice recorder evidence has indicated that Lubitz deliberately put the Airbus A320 aircraft into a descent after locking out the captain and refusing to let him back again.

All 150 people, including three Britons, were killed in the subsequent crash last Tuesday.

A spokeswoman for Lufthansa, the parent company of Germanwings, said medical records were subject to doctor-patient confidentiality and that the airline therefore had no knowledge of what they contain.

Under German law, employers do not have access to employees' medical records and sick notes excusing a person from work also do not give information on medical conditions. French investigators said yesterday that they were digging an access route to the mountain crash site in order to speed up the investigation.

The plane's second flight recorder, which contains flight data, has not yet been found.

Kay Kratky, a board member of Lufthansa's German airlines unit, told a German talkshow on Sunday evening that, due to the force with which the plane hit the mountain face, it was possible the recorder's locator beacons had been damaged and were not working properly.

"I am hopeful that we will find the recorder by physical searching," he said.

Separately, the police in Dusseldorf said a full evaluation of items removed from Lubitz's homes would take some time.

It also emerged that Lubitz was expecting a baby with his teacher girlfriend before the air crash.

Reports in the German press suggest that Lubitz's unnamed partner had become pregnant by him in recent months.

'Bild am Sonntag', the nation's best-selling Sunday paper, said that the woman had broken the news to her students within the past few weeks.

She is understood to have been travelling to the Alpine crash site in southern France when the news was broken that Lubitz was suspected of having caused the catastrophe.

There had been some media reports that Lubitz had problems with his vision, possibly a detached retina.

Debris

But Mr Kumpa said there was no documentation on any eyesight problems that were caused by an "organic illness".

Yesterday, French authorities said they had found the remains of Lubitz.

Crash scene investigators said that traces of Lubitz's body were discovered among the crash debris high in the mountains where the wreckage of the downed Airbus fell.

Families of those killed are understood to have been invited to give DNA samples to expedite the identification of their loved ones. Professor Michael Tsokos, the investigation's chief forensic scientist, confirmed that Lubitz's body was among those retrieved.

Forensics experts have been working continuously to analyse over 600 body parts. (© Daily Telegraph, London)

Telegraph.co.uk