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Copenhagen shooting: Police rule out terrorism link

Gunman (22) had posted to social media that his anti-psychotic drugs ‘were not working’

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Danish prime minister Mette Frederiksen, right, and minister of justice Mattias Tesfaye lay flowers at the entrance of the Field's shopping centre in Copenhagen, Denmark yesterday. Photo: AP Photo/Sergei Grits.

Danish prime minister Mette Frederiksen, right, and minister of justice Mattias Tesfaye lay flowers at the entrance of the Field's shopping centre in Copenhagen, Denmark yesterday. Photo: AP Photo/Sergei Grits.

Danish prime minister Mette Frederiksen, right, and minister of justice Mattias Tesfaye lay flowers at the entrance of the Field's shopping centre in Copenhagen, Denmark yesterday. Photo: AP Photo/Sergei Grits.

A suspected gunman warned in social media posts that his anti-psychotic drugs were not effective, before a shooting spree in a Danish shopping centre left three dead and 27 injured.

Police said the shooter, who was carrying a rifle and knife, was known to mental health services, and that he had acted alone. They have ruled out terrorism.

The man (22) was remanded into psychiatric care for at least 24 days after being charged with three murders and seven attempted murders at a court hearing.

A court order means he cannot be named.

He failed to get through to a helpline before Sunday’s attack at the shopping mall in Copenhagen, Denmark’s public broadcaster reported.

A 17-year-old boy and a 17-year-old girl, both Danes, and a 47-year-old Russian man, were killed. Two Danish women, aged 19 and 40, and two Swedes, a 50-year-old man and a 16-year-old woman, were admitted to hospital with gunshot wounds.

In all, 30 people were hurt, most in the stampede after the shots rang out in the outskirts of the capital. The gunman was arrested after officers arrived.

“Our suspect is also known among psychiatric services, beyond that I do not wish to comment,” said Copenhagen police chief Soren Thomassen.

The day before the rampage, the suspect published videos on social media. In them he posed holding an illegally obtained handgun and rifle to his head.

He wrote: “Quetiapine does not work”, on music playlists titled Killer Music and Last Thing To Listen To, which he uploaded to YouTube. Quetiapine is used to treat mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. YouTube and Instagram accounts believed to belong to the suspect are now closed.

Witnesses said the suspect tried to trick people by saying his weapon was fake to get them to approach.

Prime minister Mette Frederiksen said there would be discussions over Denmark’s gun laws but that now was the time to remember the victims.

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Guns can be bought by adults in Denmark but there are requirements for training and background checks. The suspect did not have a permit for his two guns.


Telegraph Media Group Limited [2022]


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