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Clashes with David Cameron are useless - Miliband

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Labour leader Ed Miliband delivers the keynote speech to the Fabian Society at its one day conference held at the Institute of Education, London. Photo: PA

Labour leader Ed Miliband delivers the keynote speech to the Fabian Society at its one day conference held at the Institute of Education, London. Photo: PA

PA

Labour leader Ed Miliband delivers the keynote speech to the Fabian Society at its one day conference held at the Institute of Education, London. Photo: PA

BRITISH Labour leader Ed Miliband has admitted that his exchanges with David Cameron at Prime Minister's Questions have not added to the "sum of human knowledge".

He made the bizarre throwaway comment as he criticised the weekly debate between him and David Cameron during a visit to the North.

Mr Miliband (inset) expressed regret he could never get back the time spent debating the prime minister since becoming Labour leader and said the sessions were "massively" putting off voters. The Labour leader has been a frequent critic of PMQs, calling for reform and suggested establishing a new question and answer session with voters to regain trust.

Yet the suggestion that nothing he has said during his 120-odd appearances at PMQs - widely considered the most important weekly event in Parliament, when the nation's leader is held to account - has made a difference is likely to raise eyebrows.

The comments came as Mr Miliband was in the Ulster University in Belfast.

"In the end I take quite a simple view about this, which is if people think politics matters they will get engaged in it and vote for it," Mr Miliband said.

"Now watching me and David Cameron shout at each other once a week on Prime Minister's Questions isn't very enlightening for anybody, let's be frank about it. It probably massively puts people off politics if they're watching it because they think: 'It's two blokes shouting at each other, what's that got to do with my life?' Look, that's something I think about quite a lot. Someone in my office was telling me I've done like 120-something Prime Minister's Questions in the last four years.

"That's sort of 120 times a long time that I'm not going to get back in terms of my life. I'm not sure it's made much difference to the sum of human knowledge."

Irish Independent