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Youngest suspect (18) in Charlie Hebdo HQ gun attack that left 12 dead has surrendered to police

In pictures: Gunmen open fire in satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo HQ in Paris Close

Manhunt continues for brothers Said Kouachi (left) and Cherif Kouachi

Manhunt continues for brothers Said Kouachi (left) and Cherif Kouachi

Police officers secure access to a residential building during investigations in the eastern French city of Reims January 8, 2015, after the shooting against the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

Police officers secure access to a residential building during investigations in the eastern French city of Reims January 8, 2015, after the shooting against the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

REUTERS

Police investigators search for evidence as an unidentified man is detained (L) during an operation in the eastern French city of Reims January 8, 2015, after the shooting against the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Police investigators search for evidence as an unidentified man is detained (L) during an operation in the eastern French city of Reims January 8, 2015, after the shooting against the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

REUTERS

Police investigators search for evidence as an unidentified man is detained (2nd R) during an operation in the eastern French city of Reims January 8, 2015, after the shooting against the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Police investigators search for evidence as an unidentified man is detained (2nd R) during an operation in the eastern French city of Reims January 8, 2015, after the shooting against the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

REUTERS

Police investigators search for evidence as an unidentified man is detained (top, 2nd R) during an operation in the eastern French city of Reims, January 8, 2015, after the shooting against the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. Police are hunting two French nationals, including brothers Said Kouachi, born in 1980; Cherif Kouachi, born in 1982; and Hamyd Mourad born in 1996, after suspected Islamist gunmen killed 12 people. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Police investigators search for evidence as an unidentified man is detained (top, 2nd R) during an operation in the eastern French city of Reims, January 8, 2015, after the shooting against the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. Police are hunting two French nationals, including brothers Said Kouachi, born in 1980; Cherif Kouachi, born in 1982; and Hamyd Mourad born in 1996, after suspected Islamist gunmen killed 12 people. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

REUTERS

Police investigators search for evidence during an operation in the eastern French city of Reims January 8, 2015, after the shooting against the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Police investigators search for evidence during an operation in the eastern French city of Reims January 8, 2015, after the shooting against the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

REUTERS

A makeshift memorial is seen outside the Consulate General of France during a vigil for the victims of an attack on satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, in San Francisco, California January 7, 2015.REUTERS/Stephen Lam

A makeshift memorial is seen outside the Consulate General of France during a vigil for the victims of an attack on satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, in San Francisco, California January 7, 2015.REUTERS/Stephen Lam

REUTERS

An injured person is transported to an ambulance after a shooting, at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

An injured person is transported to an ambulance after a shooting, at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

AP

Firefighters carry a victim on a stretcher at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. Photo: Reuters

Firefighters carry a victim on a stretcher at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. Photo: Reuters

Reuters

French cartoonist Wolinski at the 61st Cannes Film Festival in 2008. Reuters/Vincent Kessler/Files

French cartoonist Wolinski at the 61st Cannes Film Festival in 2008. Reuters/Vincent Kessler/Files

Reuters

French caricaturists Georges Wolinski (left) and Cabu arrive for a film screening at the 61st Cannes Film Festival in 2008. Reuters/Jean-Paul Pelissier/Files

French caricaturists Georges Wolinski (left) and Cabu arrive for a film screening at the 61st Cannes Film Festival in 2008. Reuters/Jean-Paul Pelissier/Files

Reuters

Firefighters carry a victim on a stretcher at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

Firefighters carry a victim on a stretcher at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

REUTERS

French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve, center left, and Paris' mayor Anne Hidalgo, center right, arrive at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015.  (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve, center left, and Paris' mayor Anne Hidalgo, center right, arrive at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

AP

Firefighters carry a victim on a stretcher at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

Firefighters carry a victim on a stretcher at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

REUTERS

An injured person is transported to an ambulance after a shooting, at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015.  (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

An injured person is transported to an ambulance after a shooting, at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

AP

Police officers arrive at the scene after gunmen stormed a French newspaper, killing at least 12 people, in Paris, France. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

Police officers arrive at the scene after gunmen stormed a French newspaper, killing at least 12 people, in Paris, France. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

AP

Gunmen flee the offices of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris, in this still image taken from amateur video shot on January 7, 2015, and obtained by Reuters. Reuters/Handout via Reuters TV

Gunmen flee the offices of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris, in this still image taken from amateur video shot on January 7, 2015, and obtained by Reuters. Reuters/Handout via Reuters TV

REUTERS

Gunmen flee after shooting a wounded police officer (right) on the ground at point-blank range, outside the offices of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris. Reuters/Handout via Reuters TV

Gunmen flee after shooting a wounded police officer (right) on the ground at point-blank range, outside the offices of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris. Reuters/Handout via Reuters TV

REUTERS

Gunmen flee after shooting a wounded police officer (left) on the ground at point-blank range, outside the offices of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris, in this still image taken from amateur video shot on January 7. Reuters/Handout via Reuters TV

Gunmen flee after shooting a wounded police officer (left) on the ground at point-blank range, outside the offices of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris, in this still image taken from amateur video shot on January 7. Reuters/Handout via Reuters TV

REUTERS

People stand outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office after a shooting, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015.  (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

People stand outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office after a shooting, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

AP

Firefighters carry a victim on a stretcher at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

Firefighters carry a victim on a stretcher at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

Reuters

General view of police and rescue vehicles at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer

General view of police and rescue vehicles at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer

Reuters

A police photographer (partially hidden) works with investigators as they examine the impacts from machine gun fire on the front of a police vehicle in the street near the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, after a shooting. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

A police photographer (partially hidden) works with investigators as they examine the impacts from machine gun fire on the front of a police vehicle in the street near the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, after a shooting. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

Reuters

Police inspect damage after a collision between police cars at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015.  REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Police inspect damage after a collision between police cars at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Reuters

A view shows policemen and rescue members at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

A view shows policemen and rescue members at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

REUTERS

Firefighters carry a victim on a stretcher at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

Firefighters carry a victim on a stretcher at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

Reuters

Police inspect damage after a collision between police cars at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Police inspect damage after a collision between police cars at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Reuters

Police inspect damage after a collision between police cars at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Police inspect damage after a collision between police cars at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Reuters

Police investigators are seen at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015.  REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

Police investigators are seen at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

REUTERS

A bullet's impact is seen on a window at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

A bullet's impact is seen on a window at the scene after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen

REUTERS

France has raised its alert to the highest level after what President Francois Hollande said was a "terror attack" at the offices of a satirical magazine in Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

France has raised its alert to the highest level after what President Francois Hollande said was a "terror attack" at the offices of a satirical magazine in Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

AP

Police officers and firemen gather  outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

Police officers and firemen gather outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

AP

Photo from the Twitter feed of @Lestatmp of the scene in Paris, France, after several people were shot dead in an attack at the offices of a French satirical magazine which angered some Muslims after publishing crude caricatures of Islam's Prophet Mohammed, according to reports. @Lestatmp/PA Wire

Photo from the Twitter feed of @Lestatmp of the scene in Paris, France, after several people were shot dead in an attack at the offices of a French satirical magazine which angered some Muslims after publishing crude caricatures of Islam's Prophet Mohammed, according to reports. @Lestatmp/PA Wire

PA

Ambulances gather in the street outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Ambulances gather in the street outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

AP

Police officers and rescue workers gather at the scene after gunmen stormed a French newspaper, killing at least 12 people, in Paris, France. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

Police officers and rescue workers gather at the scene after gunmen stormed a French newspaper, killing at least 12 people, in Paris, France. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

AP

French cartoonist Cabu in 2008. Reuters/Vincent Kessler/Files

French cartoonist Cabu in 2008. Reuters/Vincent Kessler/Files

Reuters

French cartoonists Tignous, Francois Cavanna, Wolinski and Cabu pose at the 61st Cannes Film Festival in this May 17, 2008 file picture. Reuters/Jean-Paul Pelissier/Files

French cartoonists Tignous, Francois Cavanna, Wolinski and Cabu pose at the 61st Cannes Film Festival in this May 17, 2008 file picture. Reuters/Jean-Paul Pelissier/Files

Reuters

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls (centre) stands near the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo after a shooting. Reuters/Charles Platiau

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls (centre) stands near the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo after a shooting. Reuters/Charles Platiau

Reuters

French investigating police officer takes photos outside the door of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

French investigating police officer takes photos outside the door of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

AP

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07:  Police officers guards the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving twelve dead, including two police officers, according to French officials.  (Photo by Antoine Antoniol/Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: Police officers guards the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving twelve dead, including two police officers, according to French officials. (Photo by Antoine Antoniol/Getty Images)

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French President Francois Hollande leaves the Elysee Palace after a shooting at a French satirical newspaper, in Paris, France, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Police official says 11 dead in shooting at French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

French President Francois Hollande leaves the Elysee Palace after a shooting at a French satirical newspaper, in Paris, France, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Police official says 11 dead in shooting at French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

AP

French Justice minister Christiane Taubira (right) stands near the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo January 7, 2015 after a shooting. Reuters/Charles Platiau

French Justice minister Christiane Taubira (right) stands near the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo January 7, 2015 after a shooting. Reuters/Charles Platiau

Reuters

Handout photo taken with permission from the Twitter feed of @julienrbcc of the scene in Paris, France, after eleven people were shot dead in an attack at the offices of a French satirical magazine which angered some Muslims after publishing crude caricatures of Islam's Prophet Mohammed, according to reports. @julienrbcc/PA Wirer.

Handout photo taken with permission from the Twitter feed of @julienrbcc of the scene in Paris, France, after eleven people were shot dead in an attack at the offices of a French satirical magazine which angered some Muslims after publishing crude caricatures of Islam's Prophet Mohammed, according to reports. @julienrbcc/PA Wirer.

PA

A person holds a candle in front a placard which reads "I am Charlie" to pay tribute during a gathering at the Place de la Republique in Paris. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

A person holds a candle in front a placard which reads "I am Charlie" to pay tribute during a gathering at the Place de la Republique in Paris. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

Reuters

The book "Soumission" (meaning "Submission") by French author Michel Houellebecq is displayed in a bookstore in Paris. Reuters/Jacky Naegelen

The book "Soumission" (meaning "Submission") by French author Michel Houellebecq is displayed in a bookstore in Paris. Reuters/Jacky Naegelen

Reuters

A man holds a placard which reads "I am Charlie" to pay tribute during a gathering at the Place de la Republique in Paris. Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes

A man holds a placard which reads "I am Charlie" to pay tribute during a gathering at the Place de la Republique in Paris. Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes

Reuters

People wearing stickers which read "I am Charlie" hold candles to pay tribute during a gathering at the Place de la Republique in Paris. Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes

People wearing stickers which read "I am Charlie" hold candles to pay tribute during a gathering at the Place de la Republique in Paris. Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes

Reuters

Flowers, candles and a placard which reads "I am Charlie" are displayed to pay tribute during a gathering at the Place de la Republique in Paris, following a shooting by gunmen at the offices of weekly satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes

Flowers, candles and a placard which reads "I am Charlie" are displayed to pay tribute during a gathering at the Place de la Republique in Paris, following a shooting by gunmen at the offices of weekly satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes

Reuters

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Manhunt continues for brothers Said Kouachi (left) and Cherif Kouachi

There are reports this morning that the youngest of the three Paris shooting suspects, Hamyd Mourad, has surrendered to police.

The 18-year-old suspect handed himself into police late last night after seeing his name circulated on social media, according to sources who spoke to AFP, it has been reported.

This follows a security operation which took place in the French city of Reims last night.

Earlier, police identified the three gunmen who stormed the offices of a satirical newspaper in Paris killing 12 people, according to reports.

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A witness to the attack, Benoit Bringer, told the iTele network he saw multiple masked men armed with automatic weapons at the newspaper's office in central Paris.

A witness to the attack, Benoit Bringer, told the iTele network he saw multiple masked men armed with automatic weapons at the newspaper's office in central Paris.

A witness to the attack, Benoit Bringer, told the iTele network he saw multiple masked men armed with automatic weapons at the newspaper's office in central Paris.

French police had named the suspects as brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi (aged in their 30s) as well as Hamyd Mourad (18)

Celebrated French cartoonists Cabu, Charb, Tignous and Wolinski were all killed in the attack on the Paris offices of the weekly paper Charlie Hebdo. Two police officers guarding the paper were also killed.

The gunmen escaped in a waiting car, according to video filmed by witnesses.

WARNING: FOOTAGE BELOW IS EXTREMELY GRAPHIC

Four of those injured were said to be "between life and death" today.

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Armed gunmen face police officers near the offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris

Armed gunmen face police officers near the offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris

Armed gunmen face police officers near the offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris

Tonight, crowds are gathering in central Paris in protest and solidarity against the killings. A rally is being held by France's national journalist union.

Many protesters have adopted the slogan #JeSuisCharlie, holding up banners and placards with the words.

France raised its security alert to the highest level and reinforced protective measures at houses of worship, stores, media offices and transportation.

The French president Francois Hollande called the shootings a terrorist attack "without a doubt".

Top government officials held an emergency meeting and Mr Hollande planned a nationally televised address this evening. Schools across the French capital closed their doors.

The dead include two men who went by pen names: Charb - the editor and a cartoonist as well - and the cartoonist Cabu, spokeswoman Agnes Thibault-Lecuivre of the Paris prosecutor's office confirmed.

Cabu - whose real name was Jean Cabut - was the cartoonist behind a February 2006 front page of Charlie Hebdo depicting Muhammad, following the controversy after Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten published sketches of the Muslim prophet.

The Islamic State group has repeatedly threatened to attack France. Just minutes before the attack, Charlie Hebdo had tweeted a satirical cartoon of that extremist group's leader giving New Year's wishes.

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French cartoonist Cabu was one of the journalists killed when hooded gunmen stormed the Paris offices of the weekly satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo renowned for lampooning radical Islam. Reuters/Benoit Tessier/Files

French cartoonist Cabu was one of the journalists killed when hooded gunmen stormed the Paris offices of the weekly satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo renowned for lampooning radical Islam. Reuters/Benoit Tessier/Files

Reuters

French cartoonist Cabu was one of the journalists killed when hooded gunmen stormed the Paris offices of the weekly satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo renowned for lampooning radical Islam. Reuters/Benoit Tessier/Files

Another cartoon, released in this week's issue and entitled "Still No Attacks in France," had a caricature of an extremist fighter saying "Just wait - we have until the end of January to present our New Year's wishes."

Charlie Hebdo cartoonist Corinne "Coco" Rey has told a French newspaper of the moment she encountered the two attackers as they entered the office.

"I had gone to get my daughter at nursery. 

"When I arrived in front of the door of the building of the paper, two men hooded and armed brutally threatened us. 

"They wanted to come in, go up. I pressed in the code. 

"They shot on Wolinski, Cabu... it lasted 5 minutes... I had hidden under my desk... they spoke French perfectly... they said they we're al-Qaeda."

Cédric Le Béchec, a 33-year-old estate agent, witnessed the attack on the satirical magazine.

He said that the men arrived in a black car, stopping in the middle of the street. One of them was carrying a rocket-propelled grenade. They were dressed in black military-style clothing.

Mr Le Bechec said that before launching the assault, the attackers approached another man in the street saying, “Tell the media that this is Al Qaeda in Yemen.”

The police arrived five minutes later after the assault on the magazine's offices.

Mr Le Béchec said that the two attackers fled at the wheel of a grey Renault Clio. The vehicle’s owner was being questioned by the police.

French President Francois Hollande went to the scene of the shooting at Charlie Hebdo, a satirical weekly that has drawn repeated threats for its caricatures of the Prophet Mohammed, among other controversial sketches.

A Charlie Hebdo journalist has told French newspaper Le Monday the staff didn’t have ‘any great concern despite the threats’.

“These past few months we didn't have any great concern despite the threats. Naturally, our offices were under police protection, which reminded us of the threats,” he said.

“Charb [the publishing director] was under police protection but he moved around without his policemen, which was a sign he wasn't worried all the time.”

Charb had been under special high-profile figure protection since the publication of a Mohammed cartoon in 2011 that caused controversy.

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Witness Benoit Bringer told the TV station:"About a half an hour ago two black-hooded men entered the building with Kalashnikovs (rifles). A few minutes later we heard lots of shots," he said, adding that the men were then seen fleeing the building."

A witness said multiple gunmen were involved. It is reported the gunmen used machine guns in the attack.

According to French newspaper Le Monde, the attackers 'spoke French without any accent'.

It is believed the incident took place just after 10.30am during an editorial meeting.

Several videos of the attack have been uploaded online. In one piece of footage, filmed by a man taking refuge on a nearby rooftop, the men can be heard shouting "Allahu Akbar" (God is great) during the attack.

Union official Luc Poignard said the attackers escaped in two vehicles following the incident at the weekly Charlie Hebdo.

Benoit Bringer, a journalist with Agence Premiere Ligne - who saw the attack, told the iTele network he saw several masked men armed with machine guns.

He said two officers arrived on bicycles, then - apparently unarmed - they left.

Charlie Hebdo’s lawyer Richard Malka said the magazine’s offices had been “under police protection since the Mohammed cartoon affair right up until today”.

“Charb was under special high-profile figure protection. The threats were constant. It is frightening,” he added.

It is being reported by Le Figaro that several French media offices are now being put under police protection.

France is already on high alert after calls last year from Islamist militants to attack its citizens and interests in reprisal for French military strikes on Islamist strongholds in the Middle East and Africa.

Late last year, a man shouting "Allahu Akbar" ("God is greatest") injured 13 by ramming a vehicle into a crowd in the eastern city of Dijon. Prime Minister Manuel Valls said at the time France had "never before faced such a high threat linked to terrorism".

A firebomb attack gutted the headquarters of Charlie Hebdo, a publication that has always courted controversy with satirical attacks on political and religious leaders, in November 2011 after it put an image of the Prophet Mohammad on its cover.

The last tweet on Charlie Hebdo's account mocked Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of the Islamic State, which has taken control of large swathes of Iraq and Syria.

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FBI Director James Comey said the U.S. agency is working with French law enforcement to bring those responsible to justice.

Meanwhile Jyllands-Posten, the Danish newspaper that originally published the inflammatory Prophet Mohammed cartoons in 2005, has reportedly stepped up its security.

"Surveillance and the level of security in and around our headquarters in Copenhagen and in (the west Danish city of) Viby has been increased," an internal Jyllands-Posten email said, according to Danish paper Berlingske.

"We are following closely the situation in connection with the attack on Charlie Hebdo in Paris earlier today.

British Prime Minister David Cameron described the attack as sickening as the White House condemned the attack in 'strongest possible terms'.

Speaking to the House of Commons today, he said; "I'm sure the whole House will want to join me in condemning the barbaric attack on an office of a magazine in Paris, in which it is report ten or more people may have been killed.

"While details are still unclear, I'm know that this House and this country stands united with the French people in opposition to all forms of terrorism, and we stand squarely for free speech and democracy. These people will never take us off those values."

Meanwhile, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said "This abominable act is not only an attack on the lives of French citizens and their security,"

She added: "It is also an attack on freedom of speech and the press, core elements of our free democratic culture. In no way can this be justified."

The United Nations Security Council condemned the "barbaric and cowardly terrorist attack" and called for the perpetrators to be brought to justice.

"The members of the Security Council strongly condemned this intolerable terrorist act targeting journalists and a newspaper," the 15-member council said in a statement.

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A woman raises a pen during a vigil to pay tribute to the victims of a shooting by gunmen at the offices of weekly satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, at Trafalgar Square in London January 7, 2015. Video