Saturday 25 May 2019

Photographer shot during Charlie Hebdo demonstration in Pakistan

Supporters of religious groups protest against satirical French weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, which featured a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammad as the cover of its first edition since an attack by Islamist gunmen, in Peshawar January 16, 2015. REUTERS/Fayaz Aziz
Supporters of religious groups protest against satirical French weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, which featured a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammad as the cover of its first edition since an attack by Islamist gunmen, in Peshawar January 16, 2015. REUTERS/Fayaz Aziz
Supporters of religious groups protest against satirical French weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, which featured a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammad as the cover of its first edition since an attack by Islamist gunmen, in Peshawar January 16, 2015. REUTERS/Fayaz Aziz
Supporters of religious groups protest against satirical French weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, which featured a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammad as the cover of its first edition since an attack by Islamist gunmen, in Peshawar January 16, 2015. REUTERS/Fayaz Aziz
A woman holds a sign during a civil society protest rally against terrorism in Lahore January 16, 2015. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza
Supporters of the Jamaat-ud-Dawa Islamic organization burn a French flag during a protest against satirical French weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, which featured a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammad as the cover of its first edition since an attack by Islamist gunmen, in Peshawar January 16, 2015. REUTERS/Fayaz Aziz
A man touches the spray-painted shut mouth of a statue near a poster reading "I am Charlie" as he takes part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris. Photo: Reuters

Press Association

A press photographer has been shot in Pakistan during a demonstration against Charlie Hebdo.

Pakistani students clashed with police in Karachi during protests against the French satirical magazine which was attacked by gunmen last week for publishing images of the Prophet Mohammed.

The clashes broke out when the protesters started heading towards the French consulate in Karachi. They began throwing stones at police, who tried to push them back with water cannons and tear gas.

French news agency AFP said its photographer Asif Hassan had undergone surgery and "his life does not seem in danger". AFP is trying to find out whether Mr Hassan was targeted or shot accidentally.

A woman has taped her mouth displaying the word Freedom on the tape, as she gathers with several thousand people in solidarity with victims of two terrorist attacks in Paris (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
A woman has taped her mouth displaying the word Freedom on the tape, as she gathers with several thousand people in solidarity with victims of two terrorist attacks in Paris (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
A general view shows hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris REUTERS/Yves Herman
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
A general view shows hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris January 11, 2015. French citizens will be joined by dozens of foreign leaders, among them Arab and Muslim representatives, in a march on Sunday in an unprecedented tribute to this week's victims following the shootings by gunmen at the offices of the satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, the killing of a police woman in Montrouge, and the hostage taking at a kosher supermarket at the Porte de Vincennes. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard (FRANCE - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
A statue is modified with a pencil in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
A pencil is held aloft in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
A giant figure depicting Marianne, the symbol of France, is surrounded by hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
The National Gallery in London's Trafalgar Square is illuminated with the colours of the French Tricolore flag, in support of the victims of recent terrorist attacks in France, including on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo (Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)
A journalist holds up a placard as he joins with other Lebanese and foreign journalists, activists and intellectuals during a sit-in to show their solidarity with the victims of Wednesday's attack in Paris on the Charlie Hebdo newspaper, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
French President Francois Hollande (R) speaks with Joel Mergui (C), President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France) and representatives of French Jewish associations after a meeting at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015
French President Francois Hollande (R) speaks with Joel Mergui (C), President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France) and representatives of French Jewish associations after a meeting at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015
The President of the CRIF (Representative Council of France's Jewish Associations) Roger Cukierman (2R) and the President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France, Joel Mergui (2L), speak to the media after a meeting between French President and French Jewish associations at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015, in Paris, France.
Posters are hung near to Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
Posters are hung near to Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
Demonstrators gather near Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
A statue is modified with a pen in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

The protesters were mostly students affiliated with the Jamaat-e-Islami political party.

Although there were concerns that rallies against Charlie Hebdo's new cover depicting the Prophet would unravel into violence across the Muslim world, protests elsewhere mostly passed peacefully.

Pakistan has condemned the Paris massacre but many people in this overwhelmingly Muslim country view the magazine's Prophet caricatures as a profound insult.

Police in Karachi said some of the protesters were armed and opened fire on officers first. A spokesman said police fired into the air to disperse the crowd.

In the capital Islamabad, about 1,000 people gathered carrying signs that read "Shame on Charlie Hebdo" and "If you are Charlie, then I am Kouachi" - referring to the brothers Cherif and Said Kouachi, who carried out the assault on the magazine and who had told survivors they were sent by al Qaida in Yemen.

In the eastern city of Lahore, about 800 people rallied against the magazine for a second day.

Pakistani lawmakers yesterday passed a resolution against cartoons of the Prophet and marched outside parliament to protest against Charlie Hebdo's latest cover.

In the Jordanian capital Amman, clashes erupted after Friday prayers between about 2,000 protesters organised by the Muslim Brotherhood, the country's largest opposition group, and security forces.

Riot police used batons to disperse the protesters as they tried to march to the French Embassy.

The crowd chanted slogans against Charlie Hebdo and Jordanian officials for taking part in the Paris unity march last weekend.

The Jordanian royal house denounced the latest publication of Charlie Hebdo for its front cover, saying publishing cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed was "irresponsible and far from the essence of freedom of expression", but King Abdullah and Queen Rania took part in the Paris march in solidarity with the victims of the terror attack.

In Istanbul, about 160 men held funeral prayers to honour the Kouachi brothers. They shouted, "God is great", and held a banner showing former al Qaida leader Osama Bin Laden's picture on one side and the Kouachi brothers superimposed over the Parisian skyline on the other.

There were also smaller posters with the slogans "We are all Cherif" and "We are all Said" among the demonstrators.

In Sudan, several hundred Muslim worshippers marched briefly after Friday prayers in Khartoum city centre, demanding the expulsion of the French ambassador from the country, chanting they were ready to sacrifice "blood and soul to protect" the Prophet.

Saudi Arabia's top council of senior clerics condemned Charlie Hebdo's latest depiction of the Prophet and said it only serves extremists looking to justify murder and terrorism.

Qatar said it strongly condemned the French weekly's act and urged Western media "to respect others and their beliefs" and refrain from acts of intolerance and extremism.

Algerian police struggled to contain more than 1,000 protesters thronging the streets of the capital.

Chanting "I am not Charlie, I am Mohammed", protesters left their mosques after Friday prayers and gathered in May 1 square in Algiers city centre where they were met by hundreds of riot police.

Demonstrations in the capital are forbidden, but only a few people have been arrested so far and police appear content to keep the protesters contained.

Umair Saeed, an official with Jamaat-e-Islami's student wing in Karachi, denied the students had weapons and blamed police for opening fire.

In Iran, Mohammad Ali Movahedi Kermani led prayers in Tehran during which he called Charlie Hebdo's new cartoon "shocking" and said it had no link to freedom of expression.

"This is brazenness, blasphemy, inferiority, malignancy and ignorance," he said.

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