Sunday 19 May 2019

Charlie Hebdo sells out within minutes - while Irish eBay bids rise to thousands of euro

Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

The first edition of controversial French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo has sold out in France within minutes of being placed on the news stands, a week after the bloody attack on its offices that marked the start of a killing spree that was one of France's worst terrorist atrocities.

The new magazine carries a cartoon of a crying Prophet Mohammed on its front cover in defiance of the gunmen who slaughtered 12 people at its Paris offices, including a police officer, over its depictions of the Islamic spiritual leader.

Three million copies of the magazine have been printed, its largest ever run, with translations into English, Spanish and Arabic and versions available in Italy and Turkey.

However, it is not expected to reach some Irish shelves until later this week.

President Francois Hollande paid homage to the
President Francois Hollande paid homage to the "sacrifice and devotion to duty" of three police officers killed in last week's terrorist attacks, in an emotional ceremony yesterday (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Copies in France sold out within minutes and bids on eBay have reached more than 200 times the face value of the magazine. One bid on eBay UK has reached £511.

An issue of the magazine is currently available on the Irish version of eBay for €1,997 and bidding continues. Another issue of the magazine is currently valued at €1,228. 

A woman has taped her mouth displaying the word Freedom on the tape, as she gathers with several thousand people in solidarity with victims of two terrorist attacks in Paris (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
A woman has taped her mouth displaying the word Freedom on the tape, as she gathers with several thousand people in solidarity with victims of two terrorist attacks in Paris (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
A general view shows hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris REUTERS/Yves Herman
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
A general view shows hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris January 11, 2015. French citizens will be joined by dozens of foreign leaders, among them Arab and Muslim representatives, in a march on Sunday in an unprecedented tribute to this week's victims following the shootings by gunmen at the offices of the satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, the killing of a police woman in Montrouge, and the hostage taking at a kosher supermarket at the Porte de Vincennes. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard (FRANCE - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
A statue is modified with a pencil in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
A pencil is held aloft in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
A giant figure depicting Marianne, the symbol of France, is surrounded by hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
The National Gallery in London's Trafalgar Square is illuminated with the colours of the French Tricolore flag, in support of the victims of recent terrorist attacks in France, including on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo (Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)
A journalist holds up a placard as he joins with other Lebanese and foreign journalists, activists and intellectuals during a sit-in to show their solidarity with the victims of Wednesday's attack in Paris on the Charlie Hebdo newspaper, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
French President Francois Hollande (R) speaks with Joel Mergui (C), President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France) and representatives of French Jewish associations after a meeting at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015
French President Francois Hollande (R) speaks with Joel Mergui (C), President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France) and representatives of French Jewish associations after a meeting at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015
The President of the CRIF (Representative Council of France's Jewish Associations) Roger Cukierman (2R) and the President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France, Joel Mergui (2L), speak to the media after a meeting between French President and French Jewish associations at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015, in Paris, France.
Posters are hung near to Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
Posters are hung near to Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
Demonstrators gather near Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
A statue is modified with a pen in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Furthermore, no extra security measures will be put in place by magazine distributors who will deliver copies of satirical French magazine 'Charlie Hebdo' to Irish newsagents this week.

The publication will be parcelled and delivered in the usual manner, distributors told the Irish Independent.

An explosion at Dammartin-en-Goële as French special forces move in on brothers Said (34), and Cherif Kouachi (32)
An explosion at Dammartin-en-Goële as French special forces move in on brothers Said (34), and Cherif Kouachi (32)
The scene outside the Paris grocery store as French special forces prepared to move on the hostage takers
The scene as French special forces stormed the Paris grocery store where a number of hostages were being held
Hostages flee from the Paris grocery store after French special forces moved to end the siege
Armed securtiy forces fly overhead in a military helicopter in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Création Tendance Découverte, a printing business in Dammartin-en-Goële where the Charlie Hebdo shooting suspects are holed up
Armed securtiy forces fly overhead in a military helicopter in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
A helicopter with members of the French intervention gendarme forces hover above the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Christian Hartmann
Armed securtiy forces fly overhead in a military helicopter in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Members of the French gendarmerie intervention forces arrive at the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Christian Hartmann
Police vans are lined up in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)
French gendarmes secure the roundabout near the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Eric Gaillard
A member of the security forces walks inside Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
A French Army helicopter with intervention forces hovers near the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris January 9, 2015. The two main suspects in the weekly satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo killings were sighted on Friday in the northern French town of Dammartin-en-Goele where at least one person had been taken hostage, a police source said. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE - Tags: CRIME LAW MILITARY)
Gendarmes block the access to Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Police and army forces take positions in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)
Ambulances arrive in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)
French gendarmes secure the roundabout near the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Eric Gaillard
Helicopters with French intervention forces hover above the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Pascal Rossignol
Police officers control the access to Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Journalists work near the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Eric Gaillard
A gendarme van is parked in a gas station in Villers Cotteret, 80 kilometers northeast of Paris, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, where the suspects were reportedly spotted, a day after masked gunmen stormed the offices of a satirical newspaper and killed 12 people. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)
Police officers investigate a gas station in Villers Cotteret, 80 kilometers northeast of Paris, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, where the suspects were reportedly spotted, a day after masked gunmen stormed the offices of a satirical newspaper and killed 12 people. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)
A gendarme car is parked in a gas station in Villers Cotteret, 80 kilometers northeast of Paris, where the suspects were reportedly spotted, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, a day after masked gunmen stormed the offices of a satirical newspaper and killed 12 people. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)
A member of the French GIPN intervention police forces secure a neighbourhood in Corcy, northeast of Paris. Photo: Reuters
Members of the French gendarmerie intervention forces arrive at the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris January 9, 2015. The two main suspects in the weekly satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo killings were sighted on Friday in the northern French town of Dammartin-en-Goele where at least one person had been taken hostage, a police source said. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
A helicopter with members of the French intervention gendarme forces hover above the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris January 9, 2015. The two main suspects in the weekly satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo killings were sighted on Friday in the northern French town of Dammartin-en-Goele where at least one person had been taken hostage, a police source said. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
An helicopter flies over Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris, Friday Jan. 9, 2015. French security forces swarmed a small industrial town northeast of Paris on Friday in an operation to capture a pair of heavily armed suspects in the deadly storming of a satirical newspaper. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Members of the French intervention gendarme forces arrive at the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris January 9, 2015. The two main suspects in the weekly satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo killings were sighted on Friday in the northern French town of Dammartin-en-Goele where at least one person had been taken hostage, a police source said. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
Members of the French intervention gendarme forces arrive at the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris January 9, 2015. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann
Said (left) and Cherif Kouachi, the Parisian brothers of Algerian descent who are suspected of carrying out the attack on the offices of French satirical magazine ‘Charlie Hebdo’, in which 12 people were murdered. Photos: PAtwo
French Interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve (centre) surrounded by National Police Director Jean-Marc Falcone (right) and National Gendarmerie Director Denis Favier delivers a speech as he leaves after a meeting the Elysee Palace in Paris. Reuters/Philippe Wojazer
As a tribute for the victims of yesterday's terrorist attack the lights of the Eiffel Tower were turned off for five minutes at 8pm local time

In a statement released this afternoon, newsagents Easons said they have never stocked the French magazine and have no plans to in the future.

A spokeswoman from Spar said some individual stores may also carry the magazine.

Members of the public during a vigil on O' Connell Street Dublin for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo.
Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Members of the public during a vigil on O' Connell Street Dublin for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Members of the public during a vigil on O' Connell Street Dublin for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
(L to r) Julie Marot from Ballsbridge but originally from Dijon & Stephanie Muchint from Rathfarnam but originally from Bordeaux during a vigil on O' Connell Street Dublin for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Brian McDonagh from Ballgriffin & Celestine Rossi originally from Paris but living in Dublin's city centre during a vigil on O' Connell Street Dublin for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Pauline de Regis from Dublin's City centre but orignally from Marseilles during a vigil on O' Connell Street Dublin for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Brian McDonagh from Ballgriffin & Celestine Rossi originally from Paris but living in Dublin's city centre during a vigil on O' Connell Street Dublin for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
(L to r) Julie Marot from Ballsbridge but originally from Dijon & Stephanie Muchint from Rathfarnam but originally from Bordeaux during a vigil on O' Connell Street Dublin for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
(L to r) Barbara Cik originally from Bordeaux but living in Swords & Mathilde Balluas living in Smithfield but originally from Laval France during a vigil on O' Connell Street Dublin for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Marion Beaufrere from Dublin's city centre but orignally from Paris during a vigil on O' Connell Street Dublin for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Barbara Cik originally from Bordeaux but living in Swords & Mathilde Balluas living in Smithfield but originally from Laval France during a vigil on O' Connell Street Dublin for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Marion Beaufrere from Dublin's city centre but originally from Paris during a vigil on O' Connell Street Dublin for people killed in a shooting at the Paris offices of French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

Chairman of the Irish Council of Imams, Sheikh Hussein Halawa said: "While we respect the right for freedom of expression, we nevertheless believe that other people's beliefs and values should also be respected, a value which is protected by Irish law.

Read more: 'My heart stopped beating, I stopped breathing' - Graphic designer describes ordeal hiding during French hostage siege

French President Francois Hollande delivers his speech during a ceremony to pay tribute to the three police officers killed in the attacks, in Paris, France. Police officers Ahmed Merabet, 40, Franck Brinsolaro, 49, were killed during the attacks at Charlie Hebdo, and Clarissa Jean-Philippe killed in Montrouge last week (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
French President Francois Hollande delivers his speech during a ceremony to pay tribute to the three police officers killed in the attacks, in Paris, France. Police officers Ahmed Merabet, 40, Franck Brinsolaro, 49, were killed during the attacks at Charlie Hebdo, and Clarissa Jean-Philippe killed in Montrouge last week (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

"As an integrated part of Irish society, we would like to state that we highly respect Irish values and we appeal to all the people of Ireland to stand for protection and respect for all religious values and the concept of pluralism. We do not accept violence as a way to deal with issues and at the same time we do not accept offences."

This issue's cover appears to show the Prophet Mohammed holding a sign reading 'Je suis Charlie', which translates as 'I am Charlie', a phrase which has become synonymous with ideals of press freedom and unity. The headline reads 'Tout est pardonne' or 'All is forgiven'.

People carry the coffin of slain police officer Ahmed Merabet after a funeral service at the Bobigny Mosque, east of Paris, France yesterday. Photo: AP
People carry the coffin of slain police officer Ahmed Merabet after a funeral service at the Bobigny Mosque, east of Paris, France yesterday. Photo: AP

Meanwhile, online community news site Reddit has been inundated with people from countries worldwide asking where they can purchase copies.

It has been forced to suspend their offer to take orders due to the demand.

The new chief editor of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Gerard Biard, left, and columnist Patrick Pelloux, right, comfort cartoonist Luz during a press conference in Paris, France. Twelve people died when two masked gunmen assaulted the newspapers offices on January 7, including much of the editorial staff and two police. It was the beginning of three days of terror around Paris that saw 17 people killed before the three Islamic extremist attackers were gunned down by security forces. Charlie Hebdo had faced repeated threats for depictions of the prophet, and its editor and his police bodyguard were the first to die (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
The new chief editor of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Gerard Biard, left, and columnist Patrick Pelloux, right, comfort cartoonist Luz during a press conference in Paris, France. Twelve people died when two masked gunmen assaulted the newspapers offices on January 7, including much of the editorial staff and two police. It was the beginning of three days of terror around Paris that saw 17 people killed before the three Islamic extremist attackers were gunned down by security forces. Charlie Hebdo had faced repeated threats for depictions of the prophet, and its editor and his police bodyguard were the first to die (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

"To say that we've been overwhelmed by the amount of support from all around the globe is putting it very mildly. We expected a large number of requests, but nowhere near the flood we've got,” an online post read.

"Unfortunately, that also means that not everyone who posted in the thread will get an issue. I will make sure we get as many of you the physical copies, but out of sheer numbers it won't be easy.

Read more: Thousands attend funeral for Paris victims in Jerusalem

"In order to spread it as far as possible, I would like to let you know one thing: We will most probably not be honoring requests for multiple issues from the same person. We don't want to drain Charlie Hebdo's circulation."

The clamour for sought-after copies of Charlie Hebdo has also driven some to scour eBay within hours of the controversial title hitting shelves.

Back issues of the magazine have already been selling for inflated prices across the Channel following last week's massacre at the Charlie Hebdo headquarters, while reports from France this morning said some newsagents had already run out.

French retailers have also taken to their version of eBay to sell the souvenir edition, with bids of around 50 euros (£39) being registered so far.

The publication comes the day after funerals in Paris and Jerusalem for some of the 17 people killed in the terror attacks, including the three police officers gunned down. French president Francois Hollande told mourners at the officers' funeral: "They died so that we can live free."

Charlie Hebdo's editor-in-chief Gerard Biard said the latest edition had been "drawn up in pain and joy".

He told a press conference in Paris yesterday: "We're happy to have got to it and it's been tough.

"The main story was complicated because, of course, it had to say something about us, and it had to say something about the event we were faced with. This edition - the whole of Charlie Hebdo is in it. This edition is Charlie Hebdo."

Meanwhile, Charlie Hebdo cartoonist Renald "Luz" Luzier told the press conference he had drawn Mohammed as a "man who is crying".

"We are cartoonists and we like drawing little characters, just as we were as children," he said.

"The terrorists, they were kids, they drew just like we did, just like all children do. At one point they lost their sense of humour. At one point they lost the soul of their child which allowed them to look at the world with a certain distance.

Read more: 10,000 troops are deployed to protect French streets

"I'm sorry we've drawn him yet again but the Mohammed we've drawn is a man who is crying."

In a solemn ceremony in Paris yesterday morning, Mr Hollande saluted the "courage, the bravery, the dignity" of Franck Brinsolaro, Ahmed Merabet and Clarissa Jean-Philippe, the three police officers killed on January 7 and 8.

The other dead included four hostages killed later in a kosher supermarket, who have been remembered this morning at funerals in Israel.

Seventeen people were killed in a two-day spree launched by fundamentalist brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi and their friend Amedy Coulibaly.

Additional reporting by PA

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