Wednesday 16 October 2019

Charlie Hebdo publish cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed on cover of first issue since Paris attacks

Press Association

French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo is publishing a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed on the cover of its first issue since Islamic extremists killed 12 people at its offices.

The newspaper Liberation hosted Charlie Hebdo staff as they prepared the new issue and is handling its special million-copy print run in numerous languages.

Liberation published the Charlie Hebdo cover online late last night, ahead of the satirical magazine's publication tomorrow.

The cartoon shows a bearded man in a white turban with a tear streaming down his cheek, and holding a sign reading "Je suis Charlie" (I am Charlie). Overhead was the phrase "Tout est Pardonne" (All is Forgiven), which French media interpreted as meaning Mohammed is forgiving the cartoonists for lampooning him.

Charlie Hebdo's past caricatures of the Muslim prophet appear to have prompted last week's attacks, part of the worst terrorist rampage in France in decades.

Some witnesses reported that the attackers at the paper's offices shouted: "We have avenged the prophet." Many Muslims believe all images of the prophet are blasphemous.

A woman has taped her mouth displaying the word Freedom on the tape, as she gathers with several thousand people in solidarity with victims of two terrorist attacks in Paris (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
A woman has taped her mouth displaying the word Freedom on the tape, as she gathers with several thousand people in solidarity with victims of two terrorist attacks in Paris (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
A general view shows hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris REUTERS/Yves Herman
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
A general view shows hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris January 11, 2015. French citizens will be joined by dozens of foreign leaders, among them Arab and Muslim representatives, in a march on Sunday in an unprecedented tribute to this week's victims following the shootings by gunmen at the offices of the satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, the killing of a police woman in Montrouge, and the hostage taking at a kosher supermarket at the Porte de Vincennes. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard (FRANCE - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
A statue is modified with a pencil in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
A pencil is held aloft in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
A giant figure depicting Marianne, the symbol of France, is surrounded by hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
The National Gallery in London's Trafalgar Square is illuminated with the colours of the French Tricolore flag, in support of the victims of recent terrorist attacks in France, including on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo (Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)
A journalist holds up a placard as he joins with other Lebanese and foreign journalists, activists and intellectuals during a sit-in to show their solidarity with the victims of Wednesday's attack in Paris on the Charlie Hebdo newspaper, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
French President Francois Hollande (R) speaks with Joel Mergui (C), President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France) and representatives of French Jewish associations after a meeting at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015
French President Francois Hollande (R) speaks with Joel Mergui (C), President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France) and representatives of French Jewish associations after a meeting at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015
The President of the CRIF (Representative Council of France's Jewish Associations) Roger Cukierman (2R) and the President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France, Joel Mergui (2L), speak to the media after a meeting between French President and French Jewish associations at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015, in Paris, France.
Posters are hung near to Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.
Posters are hung near to Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
Demonstrators gather near Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks
A statue is modified with a pen in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Earlier, Charlie Hebdo lawyer Richard Malka told French radio that the new issue would "obviously" feature cartoons of Mohammed.

A total of 17 people died in last week's attacks. Brothers Cherif and Said Kouachi and their friend Amedy Coulibaly were killed on Friday by police after the murderous rampage at Charlie Hebdo's Paris offices and a kosher supermarket. The three all claimed ties to Islamic extremists in the Middle East.

French police have said as many as six members of a terrorist cell involved in the attacks may still be at large.

France saw its biggest demonstrations in history on Sunday as millions turned out to show unity and defend freedom of expression.

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