Thursday 23 May 2019

10,000 troops are deployed to protect French streets

Members of the special French RAID forces secure the area for the visit by Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to the Hyper Cacher kosher supermarket January 12, 2015 near the Porte de Vincennes in Paris. Photo: Reuters
Members of the special French RAID forces secure the area for the visit by Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to the Hyper Cacher kosher supermarket January 12, 2015 near the Porte de Vincennes in Paris. Photo: Reuters
Police officers patrol in front of the Rue Pavee synagogue, in the heart of Paris Jewish quarter, in Paris. Photo: AP
Security officers take position outside the kosher market where four hostages were killed and shortly before Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's visit to the site. Photo: AP
French soldiers patrol near the Eiffel Tower as part of the highest level of "Vigipirate" security plan after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo. Photo: Reuters
French soldiers secure the access to a Jewish school in Paris as part of the highest level of "Vigipirate" security plan after last week's terrorist attacks. Photo: Reuters
French Prime Minister Manuel Valls told BFM television that France is at war against "terrorism, against jihadism, against radical Islam."

Henry Samuel

France has deployed ten thousand security personnel, including extra armed protection security at Jewish schools.

The announcement was made by Prime Minister Manuel Valls who also revealed that gunman Amedy Coulibaly, who killed four people at a kosher supermarket in Paris last week most "likely had an accomplice" who remains on the loose.

Coulibaly, who also killed a policewoman in southern Paris the day before murdering four Jewish shoppers in a hostage drama, probably received help from someone else, said Mr Valls, pledging "the hunt will go on".

Mr Valls said the search is urgent because "the threat is still present" after the attacks that left 17 people dead - journalists at the satirical newspaper 'Charlie Hebdo', hostages at a kosher market and three police officers.

All three attackers died on Friday in nearly simultaneous raids by security forces.

Mr Valls told BFM television that France is at war against "terrorism, against jihadism, against radical Islam."

Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve promised to boost security at Jewish institutions, telling parents of a Jewish school to the south of Paris that soldiers would also be posted as reinforcements.

The Jewish community has been particularly shaken by Friday's attack on the kosher supermarket, which came just two days after two other gunmen - Said Kouachi and his brother Cherif Kouachi - stormed the offices of Charlie Hebdo satirical weekly, slaughtering 12 people.

As it emerged that Cherif Kouachi met Coulibaly in prison, Mr Valls said France would move to isolate Islamist detainees from the rest of the prisoner population, so as to prevent jails from being used as a breeding ground for radicals.

This measure "must become widespread" but "it must be done discerningly and intelligently", he said.

Meanwhile the suspected female accomplice of the Islamist militants was in Turkey five days before the killings and crossed into Syria on January 8, a day after the attack Turkish officials revealed last night.

France launched a search for 26-year-old Hayat Boumeddiene after police killed her partner Amedy Coulibaly while storming a Jewish supermarket where he had taken hostages.

Authorities described her as armed and dangerous.

Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu, said Boumeddiene had arrived in Istanbul from Madrid on January 2. Turkey had received no request from Paris to deny her access.

"There is footage (of her) at the airport. Later on, she stayed at a hotel with another person and crossed into Syria on January 8. We can tell that based on telephone records," he said.

Those dates would put Boumeddiene in Turkey before the violence in Paris began, and leaving for Syria while the attackers were still hiding from police.

Coulibaly had said he was carrying out the attack in the name of Isil.

Her "heartbroken" father handed himself in after seeing her police mugshot on television and declaring: "That is my daughter", neighbours have said.

It is understood Mohammed Boumeddiene went to a local police station hours after seeing the image of his daughter Hayat published by officials, following the death of a policewoman at the hands of her husband Amedy Coulibaly in southern Paris.

Heartbroken

Mr Boumeddiene was "shocked and heartbroken" by his daughter's alleged involvement with the jihadis, locked himself in his apartment and refused to speak on the telephone after being released by police, neighbours said.

It has also emerged that the next edition of 'Charlie Hebdo', due out tomorrow with a million-copy print run, will "naturally" contain cartoons of Prophet Mohammed.

The magazine will also include jibes against politicians and religions across the board, said the stricken weekly's lawyer. Richard Malka was among the first to call for the magazine to continue functioning after nine of its contributors, including famed cartoonists Cabu and Wolinski and its publishing director, Charb, were gunned down last Wednesday by Chérif and Saïd Kouachi. When asked whether that meant more cartoons of Mohammed, which have been a regular feature in the magazine until last Wednesday's attack, he replied: "Naturally." (© Daily Telegraph, London)

Telegraph.co.uk

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