Monday 17 June 2019

Nigel Farage's Brexit Party on course to come first in UK's European Elections, poll predicts

Nigel Farage. Photo: AP
Nigel Farage. Photo: AP

Harriet Line

The Brexit Party is on course to win more than a third of votes in the European elections, a new poll has suggested.

Ipsos MORI found that 35pc of registered voters who say they are certain to vote would support Nigel Farage's new party on Thursday.

New party: Jacob Rees-Mogg’s sister Annunziata (right) will stand as an MEP for Nigel Farage’s new Brexit Party which was launched yesterday in Coventry. Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Wire
New party: Jacob Rees-Mogg’s sister Annunziata (right) will stand as an MEP for Nigel Farage’s new Brexit Party which was launched yesterday in Coventry. Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Wire

The Liberal Democrats are set to come second, according to the figures, with 20pc of those questioned saying they would support the pro-Remain group.

Labour is forecast to win 15pc of the votes, with the Tories' share predicted to be 9pc.

Ukip and Change UK are on course to win 3pc of the votes each, while the Greens are forecast to take 10pc.

Two-thirds of those surveyed said they had "definitely decided" who to vote for, but a third said they may change their mind.

Nigel Farage (R) reacts as he speaks with Italian-Swedish MEP Anna Maria Corazza Bildt during a panel discussion at a conference on Brexit, at the Saatchi Gallery in London yesterday. Picture: AFP/Getty
Nigel Farage (R) reacts as he speaks with Italian-Swedish MEP Anna Maria Corazza Bildt during a panel discussion at a conference on Brexit, at the Saatchi Gallery in London yesterday. Picture: AFP/Getty

Gideon Skinner, head of political research at Ipsos MORI, said: "Both Labour and the Conservatives are suffering in this election, while the Brexit Party looks set to be the winner.

"We've seen how Conservative Party voters in particular dislike their party's approach to Brexit, and prefer Nigel Farage's party's line, while Labour supporters are confused over exactly what Labour would do about Brexit if it were in power."

But he said the election is "particularly difficult to predict" as it traditionally has a low turnout and the new parties add to the "volatility" - adding that it will be "important to look at how the public responds after the results are announced".

"Will Brexit continue to damage the two main traditional parties, and provide a spring in the step to the others, or will traditional party loyalties recover - perhaps for the Conservatives under a new leader and a new approach?

"Whatever happens though, the questions Brexit is asking of the main parties and the voter coalitions they rely on are not going away."

Press Association

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