Thursday 18 January 2018

Injuries are horrific, says health chief

Dr David Ratcliffe (left), medical director of North West Ambulance Service and Jon Rouse (right), Chief Officer of the Greater Manchester Health and Social Care Partnership speak to the media outside Manchester Royal Infirmary Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Wire
Dr David Ratcliffe (left), medical director of North West Ambulance Service and Jon Rouse (right), Chief Officer of the Greater Manchester Health and Social Care Partnership speak to the media outside Manchester Royal Infirmary Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Wire

Jane Kirby

Some 20 people are being treated for "horrific injuries" in critical care following the Manchester attack, a senior NHS official has said.

Jon Rouse, chief officer of the Greater Manchester Health and Social Care Partnership, confirmed that some people have life-threatening injuries.

"They've been through the sort of traumatic injuries that you would expect in terms of the type of device used, the proximity to the people who were injured," he said.

"We're dealing with injuries to major organs, we're dealing with loss of limbs potentially, we're dealing with embedded objects, all the horrific injuries that you would expect."

He said the victims were "receiving round-the-clock treatment from doctors and nurses".

Some 64 people were hurt in the attack and 12 of those rushed to hospital were children. Hospitals were on the brink of being overwhelmed by the "extraordinary" number of people with critical injuries, doctors said.

Dr Steve Jones, an A&E consultant at Manchester Royal Infirmary, said the staff "pulled together in a very impressive way".

Medics worked through the night and came in on days off to treat the victims, many of whom had suffered injuries similar to being in a car crash, he added.

"It potentially had the ability to overwhelm what we were doing," he said.

Dr Jones said one of the hardest things was dealing with patients who were unidentified and separated from their families.

"If there's no name, it's really difficult to make that connection with a patient," he said.

Irish Independent

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