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Saturday 20 January 2018

Drinkers' risk of skin cancer rises

People who regularly drink alcohol increase their risk of skin cancer
People who regularly drink alcohol increase their risk of skin cancer

People who regularly drink alcohol increase their risk of skin cancer by around a fifth, research suggests.

Experts found that drinkers have about a 20pc increased chance of melanoma compared to non-drinkers or those who only drink occasionally.

The study, published in the 'British Journal of Dermatology', included analysis of 16 studies involving more than 16,200 patients with melanoma.

Light drinkers, defined as people who drank less than one drink a day (with one drink defined as 12.5g alcohol), had a 10pc increased risk of skin cancer, rising to 18pc for moderate to heavy drinkers.

In the UK, 12.5g of alcohol is the equivalent of 1.56 units. It is often defined as the amount in one drink by researchers.

Experts said previous research had already linked drinking with a higher chance of people getting sunburnt. They said: "Consumption of alcoholic beverages during outdoor leisure activities such as barbecuing and sunbathing is common."

Irish Independent

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