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'Optimistic for the future' - 68pc of teens feel life to change for better after coronavirus crisis

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Some drawings and messages stuck to a tree in Belfast as the coronavirus lockdown continues. Photo: REUTERS/Jason Cairnduff

Some drawings and messages stuck to a tree in Belfast as the coronavirus lockdown continues. Photo: REUTERS/Jason Cairnduff

REUTERS

Some drawings and messages stuck to a tree in Belfast as the coronavirus lockdown continues. Photo: REUTERS/Jason Cairnduff

New research has revealed almost 70pc of 16 to 19-year-olds are optimistic for the future post Covid-19.

The study found that, despite the restrictions on society since the pandemic, the majority of young people surveyed feel the future will be brighter.

However, 53pc feel anxious, stressed or depressed, and 66pc have spoken to a family member or friend about how they're feeling.

The majority (94pc) have stopped meeting friends, 80pc are maintaining at least two metres social distance in public; 78pc are practising strict hand-washing; and 68pc are adopting coughing hygiene. Almost 80pc have swapped real-time socialising for Snapchat (83pc) and Instagram (57pc). But there has also been a strong interest among young people in helping their own communities - 52pc have a desire to help, or are already helping others.

"As Ireland's young people come of age during unprecedented times, it's important we understand how they're faring amid such crisis and uncertainty," said CEO of Young Social Innovators (YSI) Rachel Collier.

"We're encouraged by the level of awareness among young people, their interest in staying informed, their knowledge of Government guidelines and their high levels of commitment to following these, all of which suggests they're playing their part in the national effort and know what's expected of them.

"While we're buoyed that many young people are remaining positive amid the emergency, we must acknowledge many others who may not be managing as well."

The research was carried out by YSI in conjunction with Amárach.

Irish Independent