Sunday 22 September 2019

Woman killed as Typhoon Faxai lashes Japan

Chaos: A woman holds her umbrella in high winds in Tokyo, as the area suffered damage and disruption due to Typhoon Faxai. Photo: Getty Images
Chaos: A woman holds her umbrella in high winds in Tokyo, as the area suffered damage and disruption due to Typhoon Faxai. Photo: Getty Images

Elaine Lies

One of the strongest typhoons to hit eastern Japan in recent years struck just east of the capital Tokyo yesterday, killing one woman.

More than 160 flights were cancelled and railway lines closed for hours, disrupting the morning commute for millions in the greater Tokyo area.

Direct train service between Narita Airport and the capital remained severely limited into the evening, with thousands of travellers packed into a key transport hub for both the Rugby World Cup starting later this month and next year's Tokyo Olympics.

Typhoon Faxai slammed ashore near the city of Chiba shortly before dawn, bringing with it wind gusts of 207kmh, the strongest ever recorded in Chiba, broadcaster NHK said.

A woman in her fifties was confirmed dead after she was found in a Tokyo street and taken to hospital. Footage from a nearby security camera showed she had been smashed against a building by strong winds, NHK reported.

Another woman in her 20s was rescued from her house in Ichihara, east of Tokyo, after it was partly crushed when a metal pole from a golf driving range fell on it. She was seriously injured.

Some minor landslides occurred and a bridge was washed away, while as many as 930,000 houses lost power at one point, NHK said, including the entire city of Kamogawa.

Some panels of a floating solar power plant south east of Tokyo were on fire.

The Japan Atomic Energy Agency said a cooling tower at its research reactor at Oarai, which has not been in operation since 2006, had fallen but there was no radiation leakage, impact on workers or the surrounding environment.

Irish Independent

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