Sunday 18 November 2018

Vietnam braced for killer Typhoon Tembin

Hundreds of thousands of people in Vietnam's Mekong Delta were evacuated as the region braced for the arrival of Typhoon Tembin, after the storm left more than 160 people dead in the Philippines. Photo: PA
Hundreds of thousands of people in Vietnam's Mekong Delta were evacuated as the region braced for the arrival of Typhoon Tembin, after the storm left more than 160 people dead in the Philippines. Photo: PA

Daniel Grey

Hundreds of thousands of people in Vietnam's Mekong Delta were evacuated as the region braced for the arrival of Typhoon Tembin, after the storm left more than 160 people dead in the Philippines.

Weather forecasters were expecting the delta's southern tip to be in Tembin's path, and said heavy rain and strong winds starting last night could cause serious damage in the vulnerable region, where facilities are not built to cope with such severe weather.

National television station VTV reported that several hundred thousand people were evacuated from their houses, which are mostly made from tin sheets and wooden panels.

In Vung Tau city, thousands of fishing boats halted their months-long fishing trips to return to shore.

Typhoons and storms rarely hit the Mekong Delta. But in 1997, Tropical Storm Linda swept through the region, killing 770 people and leaving more than 2,000 others missing.

Over the weekend, Tembin unleashed landslides and flash floods that killed at least 164 people and left 171 others missing in the Philippines, according to Romina Marasigan, of the government's main disaster-response agency.

Initial reports from officials in different provinces placed the overall death toll at more than 230, but Ms Marasigan warned of double counting amid the confusion in the storm's aftermath and said the numbers needed to be verified.

More than 97,000 people remained in 261 evacuation centres across the southern Philippines yesterday, while nearly 85,000 others were displaced and staying elsewhere, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council said.

The hardest-hit areas were Lanao del Norte and Lanao del Sur provinces, and the Zamboanga Peninsula. Tembin hit the Philippines as a tropical storm but strengthened into a typhoon before blowing out of the country on Sunday into the South China Sea toward Vietnam.

Philippine officials had warned villagers to evacuate early as Tembin approached and the government was trying to find out what caused the widespread storm deaths, Ms Marasigan said. She said it was difficult to move people from homes shortly before Christmas.

"We don't want to be dragging people out of their homes days before Christmas, but it's best to convince them to quietly understand the importance of why they are being evacuated," she said.

Irish Independent

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