| 13.8°C Dublin

Japan looks for missing as typhoon leaves up to 48 dead

Close

A flooded shop is seen in the aftermath of Typhoon Hagibis, which caused severe floods, near the Chikuma River in Nagano Prefecture, Japan. Photo: REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

A flooded shop is seen in the aftermath of Typhoon Hagibis, which caused severe floods, near the Chikuma River in Nagano Prefecture, Japan. Photo: REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

A flooded shop is seen in the aftermath of Typhoon Hagibis, which caused severe floods, near the Chikuma River in Nagano Prefecture, Japan. Photo: REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

Rescue crews dug through mudslides and searched near swollen rivers yesterday as they looked for those missing from a typhoon that left as many as 48 people dead and caused serious damage in central and northern Japan.

Typhoon Hagibis unleashed torrents of rain and strong winds on Saturday, leaving thousands of homes on Japan's main island flooded, damaged or without power.

The riverside town of Hoyasu in hard-hit Nagano prefecture, north-west of Tokyo, was covered with mud, its apple orchards completely flooded and homes still without electricity.

Japan's Kyodo News agency reported 48 people died from the typhoon, 17 were missing and some 100 were injured.

The government's Fire and Disaster Management Agency, which is generally more conservative in assessing its numbers, said 24 people were dead and nine were missing.

Experts said it would take time to accurately assess the damage, and the casualty count has been growing daily.

Hagibis dropped record amounts of rain for a period in some spots, causing more than 20 rivers to overflow. In Kanagawa prefecture, south-west of Tokyo, 100cm of rain was recorded over 48 hours.

Some of the muddy waters in streets, fields and residential areas have subsided. But many places remained flooded yesterday, with homes and surrounding roads covered in mud and littered with broken wooden pieces and debris. Some places normally dry still looked like giant rivers.

Soldiers and firefighters from throughout Japan were deployed to assist with rescue efforts. Helicopters could be seen plucking some of the stranded from higher floors and rooftops of submerged homes.

Daily Digest Newsletter

Get ahead of the day with the morning headlines at 7.30am and Fionnán Sheahan's exclusive take on the day's news every afternoon, with our free daily newsletter.

This field is required


Most Watched





Privacy