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Saturday 25 November 2017

Disgraced Chinese politician Bo Xilai's wife 'admits Neil Heywood murder'

Bo Xilai has now admitted her guilt, telling investigators that Mr Heywood was poised to reveal that she was funnelling 'billions of dollars' overseas
Bo Xilai has now admitted her guilt, telling investigators that Mr Heywood was poised to reveal that she was funnelling 'billions of dollars' overseas

Malcolm Moore in Beijing

THE wife of the disgraced Chinese politician Bo Xilai has confessed to killing Neil Heywood in order to stop him from revealing her financial dealings, according to a Japanese newspaper.

Gu Kailai, who has not been seen in public since March, is "highly suspected" of the 41-year-old Mr Heywood's murder, according to the Chinese state media.



But according to the Asahi Shimbun, she has now admitted her guilt, telling investigators that Mr Heywood was poised to reveal that she was funnelling "billions of dollars" overseas.



The newspaper suggested that Mrs Gu's financial affairs were already under the subject of an investigation by last November, when Mr Heywood travelled to Chongqing, the central Chinese city she ruled over with her husband.



The Asahi attributed the revelations to Communist party sources who had read "an interim investigation report circulated among senior party officials".



The report allegedly states that Mrs Gu had killed Mr Heywood after feeling "driven into a corner" by the investigation. It also said that Mrs Gu had provided a precise confession as to how she had killed the British businessman, who had been a close friend of her family for several years.



According to the Asahi, Communist party officials have now "decided to indict Gu following her confession". They are also allegedly investigating whether Mr Bo, 62, was aware of his wife's actions, have interviewed hundreds and detained "dozens of people" associated with him "including his chauffeurs, close aides and secretaries".



The investigators believe that Mrs Gu was receiving undeclared income from the early 1990s and may have transferred as much as $6 billion (£3.84 billion) overseas. Mr Heywood has been accused of helping her to move some of that money.



"Gu has also begun admitting to allegations of bribe-taking and the cross-border remittances, according to the sources. They said she has told investigators she received cash from a number of companies on the back of her husband's power," reported the Asahi.



Meanwhile, Cambodia said yesterday (FRI) it would not extradite Patrick Devillers, a French architect who had also been one of Mrs Gu's inner circle. Mr Devillers is also suspected by the Chinese of involvement in moving Mrs Gu's money overseas but the Cambodian government said it would investigate him in Phnom Penh.



Gu Kailai, who has not been seen in public since March, is “highly suspected” of the 41-year-old Mr Heywood’s murder, according to the Chinese state media.



But according to the Asahi Shimbun, she has now admitted her guilt, telling investigators that Mr Heywood was poised to reveal that she was funnelling “billions of dollars” overseas.



The newspaper suggested that Mrs Gu’s financial affairs were already under the subject of an investigation by last November, when Mr Heywood travelled to Chongqing, the central Chinese city she ruled over with her husband.



The Asahi attributed the revelations to Communist party sources who had read “an interim investigation report circulated among senior party officials”.



The report allegedly states that Mrs Gu had killed Mr Heywood after feeling “driven into a corner” by the investigation. It also said that Mrs Gu had provided a precise confession as to how she had killed the British businessman, who had been a close friend of her family for several years.



According to the Asahi, Communist party officials have now “decided to indict Gu following her confession”. They are also allegedly investigating whether Mr Bo, 62, was aware of his wife’s actions, have interviewed hundreds and detained “dozens of people” associated with him “including his chauffeurs, close aides and secretaries”.



The investigators believe that Mrs Gu was receiving undeclared income from the early 1990s and may have transferred as much as $6 billion (£3.84 billion) overseas. Mr Heywood has been accused of helping her to move some of that money.



“Gu has also begun admitting to allegations of bribe-taking and the cross-border remittances, according to the sources. They said she has told investigators she received cash from a number of companies on the back of her husband’s power,” reported the Asahi.



Meanwhile, Cambodia said yesterday (FRI) it would not extradite Patrick Devillers, a French architect who had also been one of Mrs Gu’s inner circle. Mr Devillers is also suspected by the Chinese of involvement in moving Mrs Gu’s money overseas but the Cambodian government said it would investigate him in Phnom Penh.

Telegraph.co.uk

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